Model 70 Bolt Action

The Model 70 was introduced in 1936 and is currently in production. Calibers range from the .22 Hornet to the powerful .458 Winchester Magnum. The pre-64 models include Standard Grade, Carbine, Featherweight, Alaskan, Westerner, and Super Grade. Special order features

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Model 42 Shotguns

Designed by William Roemer and introduced in 1933, the Model 42 Slide Action Shotgun was chambered exclusively for .410 gauge in 3″ and 2-1/2″ shells. The Model 42 was produced from 1933 thru 1963, with a production of about 160,000.

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Model 64

The Model 64 was introduced in the January 1933 catalog specifically as a replacement to the Model 55.  As it was originally cataloged, it was available in the same 25-35 W.C.F., 30 W.C.F., and 32 W.S. cartridges as the Model

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Model 21 Shotguns

With the design and production promoted by John M. Olin, the Model 21 was one of Winchester’s finest shotguns with regards to quality, reliability and strength. Although technically a production gun, each example was custom-made in terms of configuration, workmanship,

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Model 55

Winchester introduced the Model 55 in June of the year 1924.  This was a brand new variant of the Model 94 Sporting Rifle, and it was apparently introduced to fill the gap between the standard Model 94 Sporting Rifle with

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Model 12 Shotguns

Designed by T.C. Johnson, The Model 12 Slide Action Shotgun is the first as well as most popular hammerless slide-action shotgun made by Winchester. The model was available in 12, 16, 20 and 28 gauge; and in the following grades:

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Model 1906 Pump Action .22

The Model 1906 was introduced as a low cost version of the Model 1890, and came with a 20” round barrel. Between 1906 thru 1932, approximately 800,000 were manufactured, all in takedown configuration and in .22 RF caliber. Standard and

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Model 1901 Shotguns

  The Model 1901 utilized the same action design as the Model 1887, but it featured a newer alloy steel specifically designed for the new smokeless powders. It was offered in 10-Gauge 2 ⅞” chamber only, and a blued receiver

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Model 1897 Shotguns

  The Model 1897 was a superior slide-action exposed hammer shotgun that was specifically designed for the new smokeless powder.  Winchester manufactured just shy of one million Model 1897 shotguns, with the production taking place from July 1897 to September

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Model 1895 Lee Navy

The Winchester Lee Model 1895 (also known as the Lee Rifle, Model of 1895, caliber 6-mm, Model 1895 Lee Navy, 6mm Lee Navy, Lee Rifle, Model of 1895, etc.) was a straight-pull, cam-action magazine rifle adopted in limited numbers by

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Model 1895

The last John M. Browning design for Winchester , the Model 1895 was engineered to accommodate a new generation of military cartridges promising to gain a substantial market. One of the innovative features of the model 1895 was the use

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Model 1894

With its innovative Browning design action, the Model 1894 became the first Winchester specifically developed for smokeless powder. This model has seen continuous production since its inception and has outsold all other models. Most important of its many features were

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Model 1893 Shotguns

  The Winchester Model 1893 Slide Action Shotgun was designed and patented by the Browning Brothers, and was the first successful slide-action shotgun. It was introduced in May of 1893, and was manufactured until July of 1897. It was made

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Model 1892

The Model 1892 was another fine John M. Browning design, closely following the lines of the successful Model 1886, and was intended to replace the Model 1873. Compact, light weight, handy, and with a smooth action; the ‘92 is a

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Model 1890 Pump Action .22

Designed by the Browning Brothers, the Model 1890 was Winchester’s first slide-action rifle, and chambered for the .22 caliber rimfire Short, Long, Long Rifle and Winchester Rimfire (WRF). The First Models were offered exclusively in solid frame; subsequent models were

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Model 1887 Shotguns

  Another highly innovative John M. Browning design, the Model 1887 shotgun is one of the most unusual actions ever made by Winchester. Production began in May of 1887 and it ended in March of 1899, with a total production

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Model 1886

The Model 1886 action’s design is another result of the genius of John M. Browning and is generally recognized as one of the finest actions ever developed. Nearly 160,000 model 1886s were produced from 1886 until 1935. Offered in rifle,

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Model 1885

  The Model 1885 Single Shot rifle was John M. Browning’s first design and patent, and it was first single shot to be built by Winchester. The patent for the Model 1885 rifle was what brought John M. Browning and

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Hotchkiss

  The operating system for the Winchester Hotchkiss was originally designed by B.B. Hotchkiss. Winchester bought his patents in early 1877, after viewing the designs at the Philadelphia Exposition of 1876. It was Winchester’s first attempt at producing a bolt

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Model 1876

Introduced as the “Centennial Rifle” in 1876, the Model 1876 was basically a larger-framed, more powerful version of the Model 1873. The ’76 was offered as a sporting rifle with a 28” round, octagon or part round barrel; express rifle

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Model 1873

The 44 WCF was standard for the “gun that won the West,” though it also was made in 38 WCF (first offered in 1879), 32 WCF (introduced in 1882) and .22 rimfire (1884), with a few special-order guns built in

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Model 1866

Referred to as the “Improved Henry”, the Model 1866 lever-action repeater was the first model to be called a Winchester. Its distinctive brass colored frame (technically an early form of bronze, also called “gunmetal”) gave rise to the nickname “Yellow

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1860 Henry Rifles

Designed by Benjamin Tyler Henry, the Henry Rifle was considered one of the most advanced weapons of its day. The toggle-link action was nearly identical to that used in the Smith & Wesson volcanic pistols and the Volcanics manufactured by

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Volcanic Rifles & Pistols

The Volcanic Repeating Arms Company began producing rifles and pistols in early 1856. These weapons used the “Rocket-ball” cartridge that consisted of a bullet with a hollow cavity in the base which contained the powder charge. A priming cap held

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