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What causes forging marks?
May 17, 2020
3:06 pm
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Thanks Bob, great story attached to a beautiful gun.

May 18, 2020
5:19 pm
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1873man said
Al,

I have researched the 22’s and this is the only one I’m aware of with extra barrels but its not a takedown 22 and would require unthreading the barrel to replace.

Bob

line 97

ledger.jpgImage Enlarger  

Does the elevator have one of those selector switches to change it to Short, Long, and Long Rifle?

The way I read the ledger “two extra barrels with Complete Mags“. So I wonder what the procedure was supposed to be for swapping out the complete barrel and magazine? I’m assuming you reused the same forearm? Do you think there would have been 3 barrels, each for the Short, Long, & Long Rifle calibers?

Also begs why the frame isn’t a take down receiver?

Sincerely,

Maverick

May 18, 2020
10:51 pm
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Maverick,

 The ledger says it included the forearms with them or it would of not been listed and the way I read the ledger there is the barrel with the complete gun and 2 extra complete front ends. 

That is what puzzled me is its not a takedown and there is no selector. I have one that has a selector and it is for short, long and extra long. See the picture below, a extra long is longer than a long rifle.

Bob

extra-long.jpgImage Enlarger

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May 19, 2020
7:55 pm
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Bob,

What year / serial range did Winchester stop making the Take Downs for the Model 73?

I wonder if this gun was ordered one way and shipped out another. I don’t see a R&R for it on the ledger.

Sincerely,

Maverick

May 19, 2020
11:56 pm
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Maverick,

The take down 73’s ended at serial 186221 which is 1885 according to my survey. There is another later one serial 224162 that is a take down but letters “Pin On” which I believe is a reference to the take down pin which makes me think it was made after the standard take down feature was discontinued. My gun is 515797 which is Jan 1898. The gun entered and shipped the same day so it didn’t sit in the warehouse and then get pulled back in and changed. If it was originally made as a take down I would think the ledger would of made note of that like 224162. Its been many years since I looked at the lower tang for assemble numbers so I will pull the stock to check again to see if there was any odd stampings.

Bob

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May 21, 2020
10:13 pm
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jban said
I wonder if anyone could post some pictures illustrating what forging lines would look like on a receiver or wherever else they might be.  On an unrefinished rifle,  etc.

Thanks,  Jeff  

Here is a Model 1904 Take Down with pronounced forging striations…

 

Forging-Striations-96642.jpgImage EnlargerForging-Striations.jpgImage Enlarger

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May 24, 2020
12:45 am
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jban said
I wonder if anyone could post some pictures illustrating what forging lines would look like on a receiver or wherever else they might be.  On an unrefinished rifle,  etc.

Thanks,  Jeff  

Jeff,

striation-1.jpgImage Enlargerstriation-2.jpgImage Enlarger

This is a heavy use Model 1894 SRC missing the stud and ring. The forging lines are very pronounced due to holding the rifle for hours in a day over the course of years. It was a prison rifle owned by the state for the guards that walked the wall.

John

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June 28, 2021
1:29 pm
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clarence said

1873man said
Kirk,
The receivers are hammer forged into a close shape of the receiver while the metal is red hot. The metal gets folded onto itself and has some impurities or scale in the folds so the metal does not weld itself together perfectly.

The basic forging procedure used by Marlin & other makers probably wasn’t much different, yet these lines aren’t common on other guns I’m familiar with except Winchester.  What might account for this difference?  Differences in the steel alloy?  Forging temp.?  Steps in the forging process, that is, the number of forging dies used to bring the part to its final shape?  

Forging striations are also found on earlier Savage M1899 rifles.

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