Avatar
Please consider registering
Guest
Search
Forum Scope




Match



Forum Options



Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters
Register Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_PrintTopic sp_TopicIcon
How often do we see a checkered trigger that letters? What models? Here's an example -
sp_NewTopic Add Topic
Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 1999
Member Since:
May 23, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
21
May 27, 2022 - 9:31 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost
sp_ReportPost

oldcrankyyankee said
I’m sorry to say Maverick but the 2 pieces you have shown are round, therefore very, very easy to knurl, as it would have been done on a lathe with a knurling tool. Which by the way is round. Actually it 2 round wheels ,so to speak, with serrations going opposite way on the oblique and forced with pressure to actually deform the metal to create the diamond pattern. To do this on a trigger this way would be near to impossible. You see the pressure to “press” the serrations into the metal would deform it so bad the time needed to reshape that one little trigger would be more costly than hand cutting it. Hope I haven’t offended you or anyone else. but like i said before I’ve been a machinist and metal fabricator  for  40 years. 

  

As you probably well know they made knurling tools for both concave and convex surfaces and for all sorts of various patterns. You also don’t have to use a lathe to do knurling and possibly why couldn’t these have been done with hand tools. If they used a jig to hold the trigger in place, would it warp?

1.JPGImage Enlarger2.JPGImage Enlarger3.JPGImage Enlarger4.JPGImage Enlarger5.JPGImage Enlarger6.JPGImage Enlargergoodell-pratt-company-hand-held-knurl.jpgImage Enlarger

Sincerely,

Maverick

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments
Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 3446
Member Since:
March 31, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
22
May 28, 2022 - 9:31 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost
sp_ReportPost

Cool tools.  Have you ever used any of them?

Avatar
South Texas
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 1178
Member Since:
March 20, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
23
June 2, 2022 - 12:28 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost
sp_ReportPost

Maverick said

1892takedown said

Bert H. said

While I have not personally seen either of those rifles, I highly suspect that the triggers are actually knurled in the same pattern as the hammer spurs.

In the 1886 example, the trigger is not knurled based on the checking you can see from the trigger profile in the auction photo.  Nor does it have a border.  Based on the dearth of checked triggers out there, I would expect them to be checked by hand instead of coming up with a machining process to handle such few occurrences.    

Chris

 

I disagree and find it completely plausible that the triggers could have been simply knurled and not hand engraved.

With knurling tools the factory could cut that pattern in seconds versus what an engraver would take at least several minutes to do. And you wouldn’t need to pay the skilled labor of an engraver, so like any business the less time and money spent, the larger the profits.
Sincerely,

Maverick

For the two examples above, the 1886 letters as such and is checked.  One could argue (as some have) the 1894 example was done outside the factory (unfortunately it is outside the letterable range) but it is also checked in similar fashion.  Added to the couple of lettered but unviewed 1885 examples Bert mentioned, it appears there arent many examples to draw from.  If a moderate to fully engraved rifle receiver was $2-$10, what would the cost of hand checking a trigger be in comparison?  Maybe it was more economical to hand check them at the expense of a couple minutes for so few requested. It wouldnt take an Ulrich caliber engraver to get the job done.

I get the point your making regarding the knurling, is it plausible, possibly.  But until an example of a knurled trigger comes to light, the simplicity of hand checking a few triggers makes more sense.   

DSC_0245-Copy-3.JPG

1892takedown @sbcglobal.net ......NRA Endowment Life Member.....WACA Member

"God is great.....beer is good.....and people are crazy"... Billy Currington

Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
February 17, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
24
June 19, 2022 - 2:27 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost
sp_ReportPost

I’m going to open this up again. I have this gun and definitely looks hand cut.IMG_0265.JPGImage EnlargerIMG_0266.JPGImage Enlarger  

sp_PlupAttachments Attachments
Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 3038
Member Since:
November 19, 2006
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
25
June 19, 2022 - 2:54 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost
sp_ReportPost

Thanks for posting.  Very cool.  So, this is the M1886 .45-90 – you must have been the winning bidder?  

I agree that the trigger looks hand cut.  In fact, I think it is very fortunate there is a museum letter that verifies the checkering was done at the factory – I think most collectors would assume it was not.  Particularly as it was not a cataloged special option and so very view rifles are seen with this feature.  

Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
February 17, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
26
June 19, 2022 - 4:20 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost
sp_ReportPost

steve004 said
Thanks for posting.  Very cool.  So, this is the M1886 .45-90 – you must have been the winning bidder?  

I agree that the trigger looks hand cut.  In fact, I think it is very fortunate there is a museum letter that verifies the checkering was done at the factory – I think most collectors would assume it was not.  Particularly as it was not a cataloged special option and so very view rifles are seen with this feature.  

  

Yes Steve I was. Very pleased with it. Love the special orders on it and the fact it letters as such. One has to wonder, is it the only one? I would love to try to track down the history of this rifle, wondering how receptive auction houses are about providing info on the previous owner? anyone ever reach out to them after the sale?

Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 3038
Member Since:
November 19, 2006
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
27
June 19, 2022 - 4:41 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost
sp_ReportPost

oldcrankyyankee said

steve004 said

Thanks for posting.  Very cool.  So, this is the M1886 .45-90 – you must have been the winning bidder?  

I agree that the trigger looks hand cut.  In fact, I think it is very fortunate there is a museum letter that verifies the checkering was done at the factory – I think most collectors would assume it was not.  Particularly as it was not a cataloged special option and so very view rifles are seen with this feature.  

  

Yes Steve I was. Very pleased with it. Love the special orders on it and the fact it letters as such. One has to wonder, is it the only one? I would love to try to track down the history of this rifle, wondering how receptive auction houses are about providing info on the previous owner? anyone ever reach out to them after the sale?

  

Very pleased you got it.  The only thing that would make me happier would be if I had gotten it.  As you know, I had an interest.  I’m glad I didn’t jump in as one of us would have ended paying even in more for it.  I don’t know if it is the only one or not, but with all the years of collective experience around this site, and the fact that I don’t think anyone here has seen a checkered trigger that will letter on a repeating rifle, speaks quite a bit.  And of course, there are many other wonderful special features on this rifle, and it is in a wonderful chambering.  Again, congratulations!

Avatar
Kingston, WA
Admin
Forum Posts: 12594
Member Since:
April 15, 2005
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
28
June 19, 2022 - 4:58 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost
sp_ReportPost

oldcrankyyankee said
I’m going to open this up again. I have this gun and definitely looks hand cut.IMG_0265.JPGImage EnlargerIMG_0266.JPGImage Enlarger   

I too would put my money on it being hand-cut checkering.

Bert

WACA 6571L, Historian & Board of Director Member
High-walls-1-002-C-reduced2.jpg

Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
February 17, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
29
June 19, 2022 - 6:29 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost
sp_ReportPost

Thanks Steve ,very kind and gracious words as always from you. 

Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 1999
Member Since:
May 23, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
30
June 20, 2022 - 1:44 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost
sp_ReportPost

Most assuredly hand cut.

Sincerely,

Maverick

Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 166
Member Since:
February 17, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
31
June 20, 2022 - 10:58 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost
sp_ReportPost

Thanks to all of you for the input about this rifle, I truly thank you as it has now taken center stage of my humble collection. My next endeavor is to try and track down any of the history of this rifle. Does any one have any advise about tracking down info for it? I have to believe that whom ever ordered this rifle, then returned it 3 different times to the factory knew what he /she wanted. I would say that person was a”shooter”. One thing I have noticed since taking receipt of it is that the muzzle has some bluing wear at the 3 & 9 o’clock position, which leads me to believe it spent some time in a saddle scabbard. I would also like to add that even though the “condition, condition, condition,!” may not be what the high end collectors and purists are looking for, this gun was defiantly well  taken care of for many years and feel lucky to continue preserving it. Tom.

Forum Timezone: UTC 0
Most Users Ever Online: 628
Currently Online: elkoholic
Guest(s) 73
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)
Top Posters:
1873man: 5159
clarence: 4179
TXGunNut: 3828
Chuck: 3446
steve004: 3038
twobit: 2841
Maverick: 1999
JWA: 1785
Big Larry: 1718
Forum Stats:
Groups: 1
Forums: 16
Topics: 10277
Posts: 88567

 

Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 1401
Members: 11428
Moderators: 3
Admins: 3
Navigation