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Wonchester and colt BINS.
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May 10, 2016 - 12:42 pm
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Hi all, I have seen the use of the word (BIN) used in many books including george Madis.

Can anyone enlighten me on what the bins were and the use during the factory process etc.

George describes a 76 as having a barrel that is to late for the barrel address or something, and it must of came from the bottom of the bin.

were the bins wood metal or what. did the parts just rattle around in them or did they have partitions etc.

some pictures would be good if anyone has some.

thanks

Tony

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May 10, 2016 - 2:28 pm
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I have a flat wood box that barrels were stored in. On the side its was printed “return to foundry”  “plant #3” “property of Winchester” I Don’t know in what stag of production the barrels were in while stored in the boxes.

Bob

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May 10, 2016 - 3:27 pm
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Tony,

The term “bin” as used by George Madis (and many others, including myself) is just simply the noun used to describe any container that was used to move and store parts to be used during the assembly process. In reality, the barrels, receiver frames, levers, magazine tubes, etc. were more than likely all placed and stored in specially built racks, or segmented containers from which they could be pulled as needed during the assembly process.

Bert

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May 10, 2016 - 9:38 pm
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Thanks Guys, Now ive got a handle on it.

Tony

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May 16, 2016 - 6:39 pm
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One of the few factory photos I have come across is what I believe to be workers milling receivers. Next to them are wooden “bins” or treys or whatever you want to call them. I’m sure different component parts had different types of bins. So can see stacks of the bins behind a lot of the workers and next to them at their work station.

PlantFloor.jpgImage EnlargerPlantBin.jpgImage Enlarger

The second photos is a closeup of the bin closest to the lens on the right hand side of the closest worker. They look like model 95 or 94 receivers, but I’m not sure.  

Sincerely,

Maverick

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May 19, 2016 - 7:36 pm
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Maverick said

One of the few factory photos I have come across is what I believe to be workers milling receivers. Next to them are wooden “bins” or treys or whatever you want to call them. I’m sure different component parts had different types of bins. So can see stacks of the bins behind a lot of the workers and next to them at their work station.

PlantFloor.jpgImage EnlargerPlantBin.jpgImage Enlarger

The second photos is a closeup of the bin closest to the lens on the right hand side of the closest worker. They look like model 95 or 94 receivers, but I’m not sure.  

Sincerely,

Maverick  

Boy, the monotonous work of the factory floor could of produced a bunch of junk. I have tremendous admiration for the work ethics that used to exist in the American workforce. It made a nation what it was, and I’m afraid what it will never be again. We will prevail , but we will never achieve what our forefathers did. What have we done to our grandchildren’s inheritance. Sorry for being off topic.

Vince
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May 20, 2016 - 9:21 pm
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Vince said

Boy, the monotonous work of the factory floor could of produced a bunch of junk. I have tremendous admiration for the work ethics that used to exist in the American workforce. It made a nation what it was, and I’m afraid what it will never be again. We will prevail , but we will never achieve what our forefathers did. What have we done to our grandchildren’s inheritance. Sorry for being off topic.  

Amen to that!

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