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Winchester records
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August 10, 2021 - 2:39 pm
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Do any records exist indicating where Oliver Winchester obtained his raw materials? I am particularly interested in his walnut for gun stocks. Don

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August 11, 2021 - 12:47 am
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Don,

No… at least not any that I am aware of.

Bert

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August 11, 2021 - 2:16 am
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86Win said
Do any records exist indicating where Oliver Winchester obtained his raw materials? I am particularly interested in his walnut for gun stocks. Don  

Hi Don,

I have read somewhere (possibly in Williamson’s “The Gun that Won the West”) information on the source of the wood for the gunstocks.  It has been so long ago that I read it that I can’t recall the details, sorry.  Maybe that tidbit will spur recollection in someone else.

I did not pay much attention at the time since my .22 passion ended up with the junk wood (sap wood) and gumwood/poplar.

It may be time for me to re-read some of those old works with some fresh (old) eyes….

 

Best Regards,

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August 11, 2021 - 3:13 am
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JWA said

I have read somewhere (possibly in Williamson’s “The gun the won the west”) information on the source of the wood for the gunstocks.  It has been so long ago that I read it that I can’t recall the details, sorry.  Maybe that tidbit will spur recollection in someone else.

I recall something as well and will have to dig my copy out to re-read it. If memory serves it was Northern American Black Walnut was the standard fair. Only on special order was English Walnut used. Birds Eye Maple was special order as well. Something about the company owned some plantations and in later used when supply was low they used Southern Black Walnut. Then of course you have the gumwood stocks produced as well.

The only other information I recall seeing was this 1916 Brochure. It lists 6 Million linear feet of wood used for packaging.

1916WinchesterBrochure.jpgImage Enlarger

This 1914 Winchester Factory Portrait shows a lot lumber being stored on the factory premises in the lower right hand corner of the portrait. The 1916 Brochure shows it as well, but it is easier to make out on the 1914 portrait.

1914Plant-Small.jpgImage Enlarger

Sincerely,

Maverick

P.S. If I get a free minute I’ll try to look in Williamson’s book.

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August 11, 2021 - 4:04 am
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Maverick said

I recall something as well and will have to dig my copy out to re-read it. If memory serves it was Northern American Black Walnut was the standard fair. Only on special order was English Walnut used. Birds Eye Maple was special order as well. Something about the company owned some plantations and in later used when supply was low they used Southern Black Walnut. Then of course you have the gumwood stocks produced as well.

Sincerely,

Maverick

P.S. If I get a free minute I’ll try to look in Williamson’s book.  

Yes! those are some of phrases I recall.

Last time I read Williamson was probably about 1985.  Lots of information on the business end of Winchester but that was not what I was researching at the time. 

“With age comes wisdom, but sometimes age comes alone” (probably Oscar Wilde but, who knows, I can’t remember Jack-S*** these days.) 😉

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August 11, 2021 - 4:56 am
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Maverick said

If memory serves it was Northern American Black Walnut was the standard fair.

Yes, but the question was, where did it come from?  (Hint: where were both Bishop & Fajen located?)

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August 11, 2021 - 5:13 am
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Ooh, ooh, as a born and bred Central/Southern Missourian I know the answer to this one 😉

Born in Boone County, MO and grew up in the Ozarks,  I still smell black walnut in my sleep.  My house is cluttered (in a good way) with furniture my grandfather made from walnut on the family farm.  Great-grand-dad owned the first steam engine between Centralia and Mexico, MO (and the surrounding counties) and ran a part-time sawmill on the farm with it.  People would drag their logs to him (sometimes miles) with a horse or mule team and he would saw planks which would then be transported back to them via a long buckboard wagon.  All of the black walnut furniture my grandfather made as a young man in high school shop class came from the farm.  I still have great-grand-dads 1″ thick Black Walnut sawmill-cut plank large carpenter’s box that was mounted behind the seat on his buggy for “carpentry house calls”.

Sorry, not Winchesters but priceless to me nonetheless.

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August 11, 2021 - 3:57 pm
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JWA said
Ooh, ooh, as a born and bred Central/Southern Missourian I know the answer to this one 😉

Born in Boone County, MO and grew up in the Ozarks,  I still smell black walnut in my sleep.  My house is cluttered (in a good way) with furniture my grandfather made from walnut on the family farm.  Great-grand-dad owned the first steam engine between Centralia and Mexico, MO (and the surrounding counties) and ran a part-time sawmill on the farm with it.  People would drag their logs to him (sometimes miles) with a horse or mule team and he would saw planks which would then be transported back to them via a long buckboard wagon.  All of the black walnut furniture my grandfather made as a young man in high school shop class came from the farm.  I still have great-grand-dads 1″ thick Black Walnut sawmill-cut plank large carpenter’s box that was mounted behind the seat on his buggy for “carpentry house calls”.

Sorry, not Winchesters but priceless to me nonetheless.

Best Regards,  

Indeed, priceless memories and family history. I enjoyed reading about it and it was very pleasant to picture it in my mind.  

Thanks for sharing.

Cool

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August 11, 2021 - 4:20 pm
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JWA said

Maverick said

I recall something as well and will have to dig my copy out to re-read it. If memory serves it was Northern American Black Walnut was the standard fair. Only on special order was English Walnut used. Birds Eye Maple was special order as well. Something about the company owned some plantations and in later used when supply was low they used Southern Black Walnut. Then of course you have the gumwood stocks produced as well.

Sincerely,

Maverick

P.S. If I get a free minute I’ll try to look in Williamson’s book.  

Yes! those are some of phrases I recall.

Last time I read Williamson was probably about 1985.  Lots of information on the business end of Winchester but that was not what I was researching at the time. 

“With age comes wisdom, but sometimes age comes alone” (probably Oscar Wilde but, who knows, I can’t remember Jack-S*** these days.) 😉

Best Regards,  

I’m reading Williamson’s book now, no discussion of materials sourcing in first seven chapters. Will keep an eye out…if I remember. 😉

 

Mike

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August 11, 2021 - 4:22 pm
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steve004 said Indeed, priceless memories and family history. I enjoyed reading about it and it was very pleasant to picture it in my mind.  

 

Yes, but he left out (or repressed) the part about the TICKS!   Think you know something about ticks & chiggers?  Not unless you’ve lived in the Ozarks!

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August 11, 2021 - 4:28 pm
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clarence said

steve004 said Indeed, priceless memories and family history. I enjoyed reading about it and it was very pleasant to picture it in my mind.  
 

Yes, but he left out (or repressed) the part about the TICKS!   Think you know something about ticks & chiggers?  Not unless you’ve lived in the Ozarks!  

I’ve had my share of ticks given I started hunting in the deep woods as a child.  I didn’t think anything of it until I became aware of Lymes Disease.  That is very bad stuff if it isn’t detected and treated right away.  Given the tests for Lymes are about 50% accurate, it’s a huge concern.  And Clarence, you are correct, I completely repressed it when I made my comment.  Ticks have very much ruined my enjoyment of the woods.  

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August 11, 2021 - 6:35 pm
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Yeah, I repressed the tick memories.  They didn’t bother me much but it was a full time job keeping them off of the dogs.

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August 11, 2021 - 8:12 pm
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JWA said
Yeah, I repressed the tick memories.  They didn’t bother me much but it was a full time job keeping them off of the dogs.
 

Tell me about it–long before today’s miracle tick repellents were available.  I used to buy 25 lb bags of sulfur powder & with two hands heap it all over their backs & heads, every day; looked like a duststorm when they shook.  But even that treatment only reduced the infestation, & I still had to feel for ticks every day, including myself.  Thankfully, this was before Lyme reached the Midwest.  As bad as it is now, at least there are effective meds against them.

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August 11, 2021 - 10:34 pm
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Used to get ticks on us in the PNW when logging and hunting. Some places are now suffering huge infestations. I have been trying to talk my brother into getting free range chickens at his place. You don’t dare sit out in the yard.

Shoot low boys. They're riding Shetland Ponies.

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August 12, 2021 - 2:56 am
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Old Logger said
 I have been trying to talk my brother into getting free range chickens at his place.

Good idea, but here’s a better one: Guinea fowl.  They WILL look out for themselves!  The predator that tries to sneak into their yard will learn to poach elsewhere.

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