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How to Ruin Your Gun in 8 Easy Steps
March 14, 2021
12:44 pm
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Here’s everything you shouldn’t do if you want to keep your firearms in good condition
By Tom Keer
October 23, 2019

For over 35 years, virtually every shipping box opened by Doug Turnbull of Bloomfield, New York's Turnbull Restoration company has contained a rifle, shotgun, or pistol in rough shape. Negligence is only one of the many reasons for firearm failure. Other common problems come from accidents, while others are the result of regular use over time.

“I grew up around firearms,” Turnbull says. “My parents owned Creekside Gun Shop, which was a retail and gunsmith store. I wasn’t much interested in retail, but I was fascinated by the mechanical work done on the rifles, shotguns, and pistols. The color-case hardening process was of particular interest to me, but to work on the case colors, I needed to take apart firearms. Once under the hood, I grew fascinated by the processes used by each manufacturer. These days, Turnbull Restoration works on American classics from the period of 1880-1940 as well as modern replicas.”

Turnbull is a master of restoring guns from poor to like-new condition, and over the years, he has seen it all. According to him, these are eight of the most common ways to ruin your gun.

1. Leave Your Gun in the Case
guns stored in a store-room on racks
Properly store your guns when not in use and don’t ever leave them in the case.Turnbull Restoration
“No one is exempt from firearm problems, not even me,” Turnbull says. “I remember one odd situation that occurred while hunting Dall sheep in the Brooks Range of Alaska. My personal firearm, a Winchester 1886 chambered in .475 Turnbull, suffered some damage on that trip. It didn’t come from falling on any of the rocks or loose shale. Oddly enough, it came from bringing the rifle into my tent.
“The heat and humidity from us hunters in the tent caused condensation to form on the canvas walls. That carried over to my rifle, and when I woke up, my Winchester was covered with flash rust. I removed the rust by polishing the receiver and the barrels with a cloth and gun oil. But after that, I kept my rifle outside the tent, and there were no other issues.

“If you’re on a hunt this fall, always remove your rifle or shotgun from its case when you get back to camp. Store it in the driest area possible. If your fall trip includes hunting elk at high elevations, keep your rifle in the pack tent. There won’t be as big of a temperature difference in the pack tent as I found in tents with hunters.”

2. Lean Your Gun Against Your Truck
filing out scratches
Some scrapes and scratches can be worked out with polishing, but big dents, especially in shotgun barrels, can be more complicated and dangerous to the shooter.Turnbull Restoration
“Other common accidents I see are dents in barrels, dings in receivers, or chips out of stocks,” Turnbull says. “In most instances, they come from a rifle or shotgun that falls while leaning against a truck. Other damage comes from folks driving away, thinking their firearm is stored when it’s really outside of the vehicle. Gunsmiths can repair minor dents just as they can repair stocks. But be sure that your firearms are properly stored before moving to the next stop.”

3. Use Too Much Oil
“Problems also come from over oiled firearms taken into cold temperatures,” says Turnbull. “They function properly when you’re patterning them in the summer at the range. But in cold weather, heavy amounts of oil or grease can get thick enough to keep firing pins from reaching primers. Before you go on a hunt, have a gunsmith check your firearm’s locking systems and all mechanics to make sure they are properly lubricated.”

Oil has a shelf life, and just as you regularly change the oil in your truck, you should change the oil in your gun. For exteriors, use hydrophobic sprays as they push moisture away from metal.

4. Clean the Barrel in Reverse
gun cleaning rods and bore snakes
If you have to clean your gun barrel in reverse, use a cleaning rod guide or a bore snake instead.Turnbull Restoration
Turnbull says that improper cleaning can ruin rifling. "The helical grooves machined in the barrel's internal surface run from breech to muzzle. Cleaning rods should be run the same way, meaning, from breech to muzzle. Damage to the crown comes when cleaning rods are run in reverse, which is from muzzle to breech. When the cleaning rod rubs against the rifling, damage occurs, which affects the accuracy. At the end of a long, tiring day, it's easy to want to fast-track cleaning, but doing so will ultimately ruin the rifling. If you want to clean quickly, use a bore snake or a guide on your cleaning rod which keeps the rifling intact.

The proper way to clean a rifle is from the breach to the muzzle. Dip a bristle brush in solvent, and scrub to remove powder residue and any lead. Moisten a patch with solvent and run from breach to muzzle. Repeat until clean. Run a dry patch through the barrel to remove any solvent, and then run a lightly oiled patch through to protect the rifling.

5. Let The Stock Loosen Up
a wooden gun stock
Check your stock and make sure it’s tight to avoid cracks from recoil.Turnbull Restoration
“The stock makers at Turnbull Restoration see an awful lot of cracks behind lockplates,” he says. “Those cracks come from loose stock bolts. Upon discharge, the barrels and receiver crash into the stock. If there is any play in your receiver, get it tightened before significant damage is done.”

6. Do Your Gunsmithing in the Garage
disassembled gun parts on a clean tray
It’s important to use properly sized screwdrivers when disassembling a gun.Turnbull Restoration
“I see a number of buggered up screws,” Turnbull says. “They come from folks using ordinary tools on firearms.” Screw heads get chewed up by using generic screwdrivers, and they can be improperly tightened as well.

"Avoid those issues by using precision-ground screw-drivers. They fit screw heads properly and solve problems before they start."

7. Plug the Barrel
an exploded shotgun barrel
Although this doesn’t happen often, putting a 20-gauge shotgun shell in a 12-gauge shotgun can be deadly.Turnbull Restoration
“Occasionally, I’ll see shotguns with barrel bulges,” he says. “Bulges come from increased pressure in the tubes. A simple dent caused by hitting a tree while swinging on a bird or accidentally dropping the shotgun decreases the bore diameter and increases the pressure. Another common issue is shooting a shell if the muzzle is plugged with mud or dirt. That’s an honest mistake and usually sustained while setting decoys or tripping and falling in the woods.”

Gunsmiths can remove most dents, but bulges are difficult, if not impossible, to fix. Shotguns with bulges are not safe to shoot, so have your barrels inspected and repaired before using them in the woods or in the marsh.

Hunter safety courses stress the importance of keeping different gauge shells separated. Occasionally though, smaller gauge shells are dropped into a larger bore shotgun. Those smaller gauge shells lodge in the barrel, and when a shell of the correct gauge is added, and then discharged, an explosion occurs. This type of accident, fortunately, doesn’t happen that often, but when it does, it’s not only problematic for the shotgun but also dangerous for the shooter.

8. Mess With Your Reloads
a blown out revolver
Underloading the amount of powder in pistol rounds can result in an explosion.Turnbull Restoration
“Common issues with handguns come from underloading bullets,” Turnbull says. “Dropping from bullets with 10 grains of powder down to four grains is an example. Powder is meant to burn slowly, and 10 grains of powder burns properly, but a small amount of powder such as 4 grains burns all at once. It’s not a big issue with rifle cartridges because the sudden powder burn is minimized by the extra case capacity. Those shots usually are duds. But in a pistol, that quick burn creates a detonation that can cause the weapon to blow up. Be very careful when reloading your own bullets, especially if you like to experiment to achieve better performance.”

If your hunting season isn’t already underway, then it will be soon. Keep these eight points in mind, and you’ll keep your gun in working shape. And if something happens, give Turnbull Restoration a call. With their level of experience, they have the expertise to know what to do.

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March 14, 2021
4:26 pm
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 Thanks for the tips. T/R

March 14, 2021
4:44 pm
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How do you clean a lever-action or semi-auto from the breech?  Well, on lever-actions, you could remove the breech-block, but that creates other opportunities to do some damage.  Most semi-autos like M1s have to be cleaned from the muzzle.

March 14, 2021
5:35 pm
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A bore snake is one way to clean a lever(not thoroughly) from breech to muzzle but that’s true Clarence there’s some challenges with lever guns. And as you said some guns have to be cleaned from the muzzle.
Was a good reminder & read, especially for those new here to firearms & collecting.

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March 14, 2021
6:05 pm
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What Ive always wondered is how many cleanings with a brass rod, copper or nylon brush, cotton patch, and lube does it take to distort the muzzle in any way?  Especially if those items going in the bore are lubed and  softer than the metal its coming in contact with.  Its like asking "How many licks does it take to get to the center of a tootsie pop?" 

DSC_0245-Copy-3.JPG1892takedown @sbcglobal.net ......NRA Endowment Life Member.....WACA Member

"God is great.....beer is good.....and people are crazy"... Billy Currington

March 14, 2021
6:59 pm
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1892takedown said
What Ive always wondered is how many cleanings with a brass rod, copper or nylon brush, cotton patch, and lube does it take to distort the muzzle in any way?  Especially if those items going in the bore are lubed and  softer than the metal its coming in contact with.  Its like asking "How many licks does it take to get to the center of a tootsie pop?"   

I’ve wondered about that as well. One explanation that makes sense is grit somehow getting embedded in the cleaning rod and acting as an abrasive on the muzzle when used without a bore guide. In my business I see rotating shafts worn down where they make contact with a seal. The soft seal doesn’t wear away the steel, the grit and other contaminants that get on the lip of the seal do. That’s why I wipe off the cleaning rod every chance I get.

 

Mike

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March 14, 2021
7:51 pm
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Seen or experienced all of the 8.

My Dad always over oiled his gun and it did stick in freezing weather.  Finally I got him to switch oils and use a lot less.

Dad again, bulged a barrel on this 1955 A5 because he kept shooing steel through it.  I stuck my gun in the mud and snow once.  Cleaned out most of it then shot it clean.

One good thing he taught me was when you are done shooting lay the gun on the hood of the truck up by the windshield.  It's a safe spot and you won't drive off without it.

Believe me if you are shooting black powder cartridge rifles with smokeless powder be aware that light loads can blow up.  That is why I use toilet paper to keep all of the powder together and close to the primer.

Here is what I use when cleaning lever actions.

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1022288474?pid=944026

March 14, 2021
7:59 pm
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Thanks for sharing Chuck. I will be getting myself a set of those.

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March 14, 2021
10:23 pm
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Folks,

  Mike has a good point that I have followed a long time--wipe the cleaning rod at every opportunity.  Next, the brass muzzle guides are very good to have on hand, plus taking the time to try to maintain a straight line with the rod and the center of the bore with the guide.  Why?  I have a third model 1873 (currently don't recall its date of manufacture) and the barrel is missing the lands on the right side for about 3 inches down from the muzzle!  Likely a lot of rod wear, possibly accelerated with grit on the rod.  BTW I have both carbon fiber rods (my preferred) and stainless.  All one piece.  My M-16 cleaning kit goes with me on hunts--its better than a whittled stick!.  

Tim

March 14, 2021
10:30 pm
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More good info. Thanks Tim!!

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March 15, 2021
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RickC said
Thanks for sharing Chuck. I will be getting myself a set of those.  

You may have to modify them.  The jag is often bigger than the hole.  Also place your lever guns upside down so all the junk falls out.

In addition to what Tim said I also have used a shotgun rod for the larger calibers.  Way less flex.  The .410 stuff works good for the 44 and 45 calibers.

March 15, 2021
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Thanks for the heads up Chuck & I also use shotgun rods for my 44 & 45 cal’s.

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March 15, 2021
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Folks,  Put the bore guide on the rod before screwing the jag onto the rod.  That way it also won't fall off onto the floor!  TimLaugh

March 17, 2021
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Tim, that works but you are now starting the jag against the bore. Probably doesn't hurt but I like to have the guide line me up. I have done it both ways and have had no problems. Sure is easier your way.

March 18, 2021
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The 'Poor man's bore guide' can easily be made by using a tubing cutter to remove the rim of a .270 or 220 Swift case.  The neck fits nicely down the bore to protect the rifling at the muzzle.  Wink  RDB

March 18, 2021
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rogertherelic said
The 'Poor man's bore guide' can easily be made by using a tubing cutter to remove the rim of a .270 or 220 Swift case.  The neck fits nicely down the bore to protect the rifling at the muzzle.  Wink  RDB  

Roger that is a good idea.  I modify cases for other projects.  I just push them against my 12" disk sander until I get the length I want or to remove the entire head. Chamfer and de burr.  I recently worked on 2 broken canes and used cases to replace the ferrules.  Ran them through sizing dies to expand them and make a shoulder.  One of them I used the bullet for the tip.  Here is one I am working on now.

Cane.jpgImage Enlarger

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March 19, 2021
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Very nice, Chuck! I have a bucket for scrap brass and a few have been repurposed but your work is inspiring. I put some on the ends of dowel rods when slugging barrels. I’ve used a few as emergency brass “punches” for drifting sights at the range. I clearly need to expand my horizons.

 

Mike

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March 19, 2021
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This has been a great thread.  

March 19, 2021
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TXGunNut said
Very nice, Chuck! I have a bucket for scrap brass and a few have been repurposed but your work is inspiring. I put some on the ends of dowel rods when slugging barrels. I’ve used a few as emergency brass “punches” for drifting sights at the range. I clearly need to expand my horizons.

 

Mike  

Thanks Mike.  This one I made the shaft.  I will probably paint this one black.  Tried a few stains but none look right for the handle.  Not quite happy with the ferrule yet.

April 29, 2021
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Wait, what, you have to clean your guns breech to muzzle? I've always done it the other way around... I'm using carbon fiber rods and I hope I haven't damaged my guns too much!

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