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1892 Serial Number Restoration
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Virginia Beach
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September 5, 2021 - 11:30 pm
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Hello,

I’m a new member so please bare with me. I have an affinity for John Browning designs. My latest purchase is a basket case 1892 made in 1895. It’s in pieces, but I think it’s salvageable.

I have 2 questions for this gun to start with.

1. The serial number is very worn and faded. Is there a way to get that restored?

2. There are markings on the bottom of the barrel. I’ve included a pic. Any clue as to what these markings mean?

Corey

Winchester 1892 (1898)

Winchester 1894 (1956)

Winchester 1897 (1909)

Winchester 1911 (1911)

Browning A5 Sweet Sixteen (1959)

Browning Superposed (1962)

Browning Hi Power (1949 - 1954)

Browning 1910 (1910)

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September 6, 2021 - 12:16 am
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Any one who does engraving  should be able to “recut” the serial #’s.

  As far as the lettering on the bottom of the barrel, some would be inspectors marks and possibly a VP which stands for “violent proof”. 

Erin

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September 6, 2021 - 4:12 am
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Corey Freeman said
2. There are markings on the bottom of the barrel. I’ve included a pic. Any clue as to what these markings mean?  

What picture?

Sincerely,

Maverick

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September 6, 2021 - 1:43 pm
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 You might consider checking with Cody what the gun letters as before you start the restoration. Once the serial number has been played with any history or rare configuration is lost. I consider every serial number a lottery ticket, if you don’t check you can’t win. T/R

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September 6, 2021 - 3:13 pm
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Erin Grivicich said
Any one who does engraving  should be able to “recut” the serial #’s.

 

True, but having it done properly may cost more than it’s reasonable to spend on a “basket case.”  Engraving letters requires far more skill than scroll or floral work, & I’ve never seen hand-cut lettering that would pass for a die-stamp; though “touching up” worn markings would be less demanding.

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September 6, 2021 - 6:16 pm
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clarence said

Erin Grivicich said
Any one who does engraving  should be able to “recut” the serial #’s.
 

True, but having it done properly may cost more than it’s reasonable to spend on a “basket case.”  Engraving letters requires far more skill than scroll or floral work, & I’ve never seen hand-cut lettering that would pass for a die-stamp; though “touching up” worn markings would be less demanding.  

Touching up is exactly what he is talking about.

 On another note cutting fresh lettering or numerals is not as difficult as you may imagine as long as the originals are in place (or you have another with duplicate lettering) but have to be removed because of welding or heavy polishing. One simply smokes the metal, transfers the lettering with a piece of scotch tape onto a index card and take it with you to the engraver. If the engraver is worth a pinch of salt, it’s a no brainer…..  My guy charges $10 per letter or numeral. Unless you use magnification, it looks quite right. (after all, we are now talking about a refinished firearm)  In the OP’s case a 3rd year manufacture would be a 5 digit number which would equate to $50 to have the numerals freshened up.

Erin

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September 6, 2021 - 6:43 pm
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Thanks for the replies.

I thought that I had added my pics, but I guess I still have some learning to do on here.

 

I have reached out to a few engravers, but I have not had any positive responses yet. The proofs on the bottom of the barrel are just a curiosity more than anything else. I had never seen them before.

 

Bottom-Barrel-Markings.jpgImage EnlargerSerial-Number.jpgImage Enlarger

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Corey

Winchester 1892 (1898)

Winchester 1894 (1956)

Winchester 1897 (1909)

Winchester 1911 (1911)

Browning A5 Sweet Sixteen (1959)

Browning Superposed (1962)

Browning Hi Power (1949 - 1954)

Browning 1910 (1910)

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September 6, 2021 - 9:00 pm
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 Do all the parts come from one gun or is this “basket case” a collection of enough spare parts to build a gun?  This hobby has people buying guns to part them out, and people buying the parts to put them back together. The first guy makes money and the second guy gets into a gun under water. T/R

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September 6, 2021 - 9:32 pm
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TR said
 The first guy makes money and the second guy gets into a gun under water. T/R  

No truer words.  Judging by the photos, a full restoration of this gun is going to give someone a dunking.  Unless Doug Turnbull accepts charity cases.

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September 6, 2021 - 11:37 pm
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As far as the seller knows, all of the parts are original to the gun.

I do plan on getting the Cody report for the gun. Do members here get a discount for that?

 

My plans for the gun is to make it functional again. An intact working 1892 is a little out of my price range, but I can tinker with the best of them. I already have 2 Rossi 92’s and a Winchester 1894. I have a small “working” collection, long guns, shotguns, and handguns, and most are Browning designs. I’m not looking for pristine, more of a functional example. The wood is in surprisingly good shape and is currently getting a medicinal dose of BLO.

Corey

Winchester 1892 (1898)

Winchester 1894 (1956)

Winchester 1897 (1909)

Winchester 1911 (1911)

Browning A5 Sweet Sixteen (1959)

Browning Superposed (1962)

Browning Hi Power (1949 - 1954)

Browning 1910 (1910)

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September 7, 2021 - 12:12 am
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I wouldn’t spend any money on the serial number. You can read it the way it is and its still original.

Bob

WACA Life Member---
NRA Life Member----
Cody Firearms member since 1991
Researching the Winchester 1873's

73_86cutaway.jpg

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September 7, 2021 - 6:49 pm
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1873man said
I wouldn’t spend any money on the serial number. You can read it the way it is and its still original.

Bob  

That’s good advice

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