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January 16, 2023 - 6:35 pm
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Hello, 

 

can the headspace of a 1892 in .32-20 be fixed? I think it has a quite loose bolt and when put a fired primer a bit in a case it is not seated fully. 

How is this issue repaired? I think it is not done by screwing the barrel in more into the receiver like with a bolt gun. 

 

Thanks regards 

 

David

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January 16, 2023 - 7:50 pm
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You have confused me a bit?  “when put a fired primer a bit in a case it is not seated fully” ??  The head space is controlled by the rim thickness.   If you take scotch tape and add layers to the back of the rim you can figure out how much slop you may have.  Most tape is around .002″ thick.  Use calipers to verify.  Place the tape on the case and then rotate the case edge on a hard surface to cut the excess off so it is round like the case.  Most Winchesters are set up for about .006″ of variation from absolutely tight to max head space.  Gunsmiths can fix this. 

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January 16, 2023 - 8:25 pm
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Head spaced is between the case and the bolt face not primer to case. You can tell if you have a headspace issue if the primer starts to bulge out after you fire a shell.

Bob

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Researching the Winchester 1873's

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January 16, 2023 - 9:41 pm
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Hello, 

 

Oh sorry for not describing it correctly. I know the way with the scotch tape. 

 

What I meant is the method, putting a fired primer a bit into the primer pocket and close the bolt so that the bolt seats the primer. 

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January 17, 2023 - 5:15 pm
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David1892 said
Hello, 

Oh sorry for not describing it correctly. I know the way with the scotch tape. 

What I meant is the method, putting a fired primer a bit into the primer pocket and close the bolt so that the bolt seats the primer. 

  

Why in the world in any scenario would you want the bolt to seat the primer? What are you expecting this to tell you?

The primer should already be well seated upon reloading the cartridge and prior to chambering a round. 

Are you having trouble using Factory loaded rounds? Or your own reloads?

I’d first check to see that the ammo is not the issue, then worry about the gun.

Sincerely,

Maverick

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January 17, 2023 - 5:21 pm
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Unless a ’92 is badly worn, headspace is rarely an issue.  If it is in fact headspace, it is because the locking blocks or the channels cut on each side near the rear of the bolt are worn.   As per design, these blocks are hard as flint, but I have seen some that were so worn that they actually had grooves worn in the top from the bolt sliding across them.   If this is the case, you may have more problems than just the blocks.    The grooves in the breech bolt and the receiver may also be very worn.  A model ’92 is one of the easiest Winchester lever actions to disassemble, but unless you are familiar with this procedure, you’ll be much better off having a gunsmith do it for you.  The other problem you’ll run into, is finding these parts.

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January 17, 2023 - 10:09 pm
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Maverick said

David1892 said

Hello, 

Oh sorry for not describing it correctly. I know the way with the scotch tape. 

What I meant is the method, putting a fired primer a bit into the primer pocket and close the bolt so that the bolt seats the primer. 

  

Why in the world in any scenario would you want the bolt to seat the primer? What are you expecting this to tell you?

The primer should already be well seated upon reloading the cartridge and prior to chambering a round. 

Are you having trouble using Factory loaded rounds? Or your own reloads?

I’d first check to see that the ammo is not the issue, then worry about the gun.

Sincerely,

Maverick

  

Hello, a spent sprimer to get an idea what the headspace is. When the bolt is closed the primer is pushed inside the case. When the primer protrudes, you can measure it and have an idea if headspace is to big.

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January 17, 2023 - 10:28 pm
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Your post is very confusing.  Now I understand your method for checking headspace.  I guess my question would be, have you fired any live ammo in this gun and if so, what makes you think there is an issue with headspace?

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January 17, 2023 - 10:42 pm
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David1892 said
Hello, 

 

Oh sorry for not describing it correctly. I know the way with the scotch tape. 

 

What I meant is the method, putting a fired primer a bit into the primer pocket and close the bolt so that the bolt seats the primer. 

  

What would you do next?  Because of the built in headspace the primer could still stick out some.  When new, a Winchester can have a max headspace of .007″. The front of the rim is what hits the chamber. Like Bob said the space is behind the case and between the bolt face. When the firing pin hits the primer it will push the case rim forward. If you threaded more of the barrel this would allow you to move the chamber closer to the bolt face and could reduce excess space. 

I would do the tape method and figure out how much space you have between the bolt face and the case when the rim is pushed up against the chamber.   At some point when adding tape the bolt won’t close.

Some have added shims to the bolt face but I really think this is not the best way.

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January 18, 2023 - 6:37 pm
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David1892 said

Maverick said

David1892 said

Hello, 

Oh sorry for not describing it correctly. I know the way with the scotch tape. 

What I meant is the method, putting a fired primer a bit into the primer pocket and close the bolt so that the bolt seats the primer. 

  

Why in the world in any scenario would you want the bolt to seat the primer? What are you expecting this to tell you?

The primer should already be well seated upon reloading the cartridge and prior to chambering a round. 

Are you having trouble using Factory loaded rounds? Or your own reloads?

I’d first check to see that the ammo is not the issue, then worry about the gun.

Sincerely,

Maverick

  

Hello, a spent sprimer to get an idea what the headspace is. When the bolt is closed the primer is pushed inside the case. When the primer protrudes, you can measure it and have an idea if headspace is to big.

  

This might work assuming the case rim has been pushed up against the chamber and you have measured the rim thickness of several cases and see if they meet the standard thickness.  .064″ for 32-20.  Standard brass can be very inconsistent.

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