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Thoughts on online seller
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January 28, 2022 - 1:56 am
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I recently emailed a seller advertising a 115 year old Model 1895 with a lot of issues. The asking price seems reasonable given the condition. I stated in my email that I am considering the gun to restore and asked the seller (they have a brick and mortar gun shop) to send me several pictures of the gun specifically for areas of concern. The only pictures online are 3 very low resolution pics of each side and the top.

The reply I got was surprising. The seller stated that they didn’t have time to send me pictures but I should call sales and they would be glad to answer any questions I have with the gun in their hands. Somehow I think taking 4 to 6 pics and emailing them will take less time than a phone call and would give me a lot better idea of the condition. At this time I am choosing not to call based on the lack of reasonable response on the seller’s part.

Do you think I am being to harsh or should I just move on to another gun?

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January 28, 2022 - 2:18 am
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Mark,

Move on, Any seller not willing to send you more photos is a sign there will be more problems if you proceed.

Bob

WACA Life Member---
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Cody Firearms member since 1991
Researching the Winchester 1873's

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Email: [email protected]

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January 28, 2022 - 2:18 am
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[email protected] said
I recently emailed a seller advertising a 115 year old Model 1895 with a lot of issues. The asking price seems reasonable given the condition. I stated in my email that I am considering the gun to restore and asked the seller (they have a brick and mortar gun shop) to send me several pictures of the gun specifically for areas of concern. The only pictures online are 3 very low resolution pics of each side and the top.

The reply I got was surprising. The seller stated that they didn’t have time to send me pictures but I should call sales and they would be glad to answer any questions I have with the gun in their hands. Somehow I think taking 4 to 6 pics and emailing them will take less time than a phone call and would give me a lot better idea of the condition. At this time I am choosing not to call based on the lack of reasonable response on the seller’s part.

Do you think I am being to harsh or should I just move on to another gun?  

I can’t say I’m surprised.  Many shops have this attitude.  It is quite a contrast to internet sellers such as austinsguns or chayns who will post 100 to 150 high quality photos from every possible angle.  In your current scenario, the chance that you will receive a rifle that is not what you had envisioned, is quite high.  I would move to another rifle.  

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January 28, 2022 - 2:22 am
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If I were you, I would move on. They must not want to sell the gun that bad.  Plus, what are they trying to hide, and what kind of customer service would you expect if you were to buy the gun and something was not right.

My two cents.

Al

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January 28, 2022 - 3:15 pm
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Mark,  We all have a “little voice” in the pits of our stomachs that tell us things.  Obvious to me yours did or you would not have asked the question.  Many of us at times don’t listen and end up regretting not listening to that voice!  Like the others I believe it best you look elsewhere for another rifle.  They are out there and your inner voice will likely let you know what to do then.  Tim

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January 28, 2022 - 3:50 pm
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Mark – first let me say, “each to his own” as far as what a person wants to pursue.  You state right off the bat the gun has a lot of issues and if you purchased it, you would plan to restore it.  Model 1895’s are far from rare.  And, truth be told, they are not as popular among collectors and usually go for less money than more popular models such as the Model 1886.  Were it me, I would take the money I was going to use for the purchase, and take the money I was going to use for the restoration, and put it toward an all original piece.  With this method, you end up with an all original piece.  Even if the rifle you are interested in turns out to not have an more issues that you are aware of, after restoration, you still end up with a non-original piece.  

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January 28, 2022 - 4:39 pm
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“How it starts, Is how it goes”

If it’s aggravation now it won’t get any better – Life is too short to put up with BS.

D.

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January 28, 2022 - 5:38 pm
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Take Steve’s advise.  Get one that doesn’t need to be restored.  Your money will be better spent.

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January 28, 2022 - 8:23 pm
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Chuck said
Take Steve’s advise.  Get one that doesn’t need to be restored.  Your money will be better spent.  

steve004 said
Mark – first let me say, “each to his own” as far as what a person wants to pursue.  You state right off the bat the gun has a lot of issues and if you purchased it, you would plan to restore it.  Model 1895’s are far from rare.  And, truth be told, they are not as popular among collectors and usually go for less money than more popular models such as the Model 1886.  Were it me, I would take the money I was going to use for the purchase, and take the money I was going to use for the restoration, and put it toward an all original piece.  With this method, you end up with an all original piece.  Even if the rifle you are interested in turns out to not have an more issues that you are aware of, after restoration, you still end up with a non-original piece.    

 Well said, great advice. T/R

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January 29, 2022 - 3:28 am
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Thank to all who have replied and pretty much validated my thoughts. I plan to move on and hope to find something that is in good condition.

I do like an occasional project to restore and/or customize. I got into the gun hobby to fill the void left by the need to stop restoring old cars due to several back surgeries. While restoring a couple of older guns, including a pre WW2 1894 carbine, I caught the bug for original Winchesters in good, original condition. I would never restore or customize a decent Winchester.

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