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"Receiver striations"
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July 14, 2014 - 6:43 pm
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Hello: I am a bit of a beginner at evaluating antique Winchesters for evidence of refinishing. I have seen this term used (apparently as evidence of originality/non-refinished?; could someone please explain what these striations look like and what is their significance? Thank you.

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July 14, 2014 - 7:00 pm
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They run lengthwise on the receiver, and are not necessarily completely straight lines and usually do not run the entire length of the receiver. Others more knowledgeable about metallurgy will have more to say, I am sure, but they are evident in an original-finished gun, and usually indicate originality. Can be quite evident on the receiver of a strongly-blued gun. If refinished, the reblue makes them inevident. Lack of striations does not necessarily mean a refinish, however. I don’t know if the finish originally possessed striations on these receivers when new, or if it is something that develops on the receiver over time on a 100+ year old gun. I particularly like the look of a 100+ year old gun with 95%+ bluing with striations…

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July 14, 2014 - 7:13 pm
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Look under Winchester Rifles: Bottom tang stamp post, the pictures of the receiver of that rifle and you will see them running horizontally through the blue of the receiver.
Gene Wink

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July 14, 2014 - 8:07 pm
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The striations are caused by the manufacturing process of the receiver. The receiver is forged where the metal is hammered or put in a press and as the metal is shaped it forms folds or wrinkles. When the metal is machined and finished these folds are still there but over time the folds don’t hold the finish as well as the rest of the metal. The striations are a sign that its a old finish since it take time to develop. So far no one has been able to duplicate them with modern refinishing.

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July 15, 2014 - 2:57 am
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I have an 1895 flatside that was re-blued,( yet shows the striations as deeper grooves than I have seen on other models) prominently under the blue. I am assuming that they were particularly deep, and receiver did not need any sanding or buffing. I am wondering if the new blue on top will lose the finish where the lines show, also whether they would have shown thru the original blue when the gun was new?

Phil

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July 15, 2014 - 6:54 am
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Phil,

If you have grooves where the striations are after rebluing then the receiver was not prepared right before bluing. On a new gun you don’t see the striations through the blue. The striations show up because there are contaminates caught in the metal, the steel did not weld together when it got folded and the blue did not stick as well. Over time after the blue was lost in those areas the metal oxidized and you have metal lost and you get grooves.

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July 17, 2014 - 8:51 pm
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Thank you very much for the excellent explanations and for pointing out the close-up photos of striations.

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July 18, 2014 - 4:29 am
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Thanks Bob for your explanation . I guess my receiver wasnt buffed down , because there would have to be about .010 or so ground off the receiver.? I thought it would be a better situation not buffed, but wounder if the grooves will continue to deepen ? There is no evidence of this yet . It is an old re- blue and the blue is fully intact over grooves with no evidence of new erosion or flaking along the grooves

Phil

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July 18, 2014 - 8:30 am
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Phil,

We don’t know how well the metal in the groves was cleaned before bluing so there could be a problem with the blue flaking there at some point. The only thing you can do is keep it oiled.

Bob

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