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Selling .32 Winchester Special Brass--43 count
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April 30, 2024 - 3:17 am
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Selling .32 Winchester Special brass.  All are in excellent condition.  The 20 count box of Remington are once-fired.  The other 23 are Winchester/Western and in excellent condition.  Asking $30 plus $10 shipping for all.  Please send me a PM if interested.

Thanks,

Don

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May 1, 2024 - 1:51 am
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Sold.  Thanks Nick!

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May 1, 2024 - 4:25 pm
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Good to see the .32 Special fans are alive and well!

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May 1, 2024 - 4:30 pm
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And just why is .32 Special so unpopular?  It’s essentially a .30-30, but improved.

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May 1, 2024 - 5:02 pm
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mrcvs said
It’s essentially a .30-30, but improved.

That is debatable.  Both cartridges were loaded with a 170-gr flat-point bullet, and at nearly identical muzzle velocities.  Because the .308 bullet used in the 30 WCF has a higher BC, it also has better down-range performance as compared to the 32 W.S. (flatter shooting). When it comes to the ammo, it is much easier to find 30-30 than it is 32 Win Spl.  For those reasons, the 30-30 Win will forever dominate the 32 Win Spl in the market place.

In my research survey of the Model 94 (1932 – 1963) the following tables document the caliber production;

Model-94-Caliber-Production-1.jpgImage EnlargerModel-94-Caliber-Production-2.jpgImage Enlarger

 

Bert

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May 2, 2024 - 5:05 pm
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The 32 Win SPL is a necked up 30-30 case.  The 32 shoots a larger diameter (.321″) and heavier bullet, 170 gr vs 150 grain for the 30-30.  The 30-30 velocity is greater at 2270 fps vs the 32 at 2100 fps.  I have never owned a 32 SPL but I bet the down range energy is greater than the 30-30. 

To put these 2 in perspective I shoot a 308 with 168 grain bullets at 2630 fps.  This is an accuracy load not a hunting load.  The hunting load would probably be a little faster.

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May 2, 2024 - 5:34 pm
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Chuck said
The 32 Win SPL is a necked up 30-30 case.  The 32 shoots a larger diameter (.321″) and heavier bullet, 170 gr vs 150 grain for the 30-30.  The 30-30 velocity is greater at 2270 fps vs the 32 at 2100 fps.  I have never owned a 32 SPL but I bet the down range energy is greater than the 30-30. 

To put these 2 in perspective I shoot a 308 with 168 grain bullets at 2630 fps.  This is an accuracy load not a hunting load.  The hunting load would probably be a little faster.

  

Chuck,

The 150-gr factory 30-30 load is a modern cartridge change.  The original 30 WCF load was 170-grs, and it remained the standard factory load for most of its history.  The 150-gr factory 30-30 load was introduced in the 1970s. 

That stated, the higher muzzle velocity and greater BC of the 150-gr .308 bullet enables it to retain better down-range energy than the .321 bullet.  It sheds less velocity at all distances, and due to the faster 1:12 twist rate, it remains stable for much longer distances than the 1:16 twist rate for the 32 Win Spl.

For the reloaders out there, the .30 caliber bullet selection is hands down way better than it is for the .32 caliber.

A quick check of the current published ballistics for both cartridges;

30-30 Win 150-gr factory load = 2,390 FPS & 1,902 FPE

32 Win Spl 170-gr factory load = 2,250 FPS & 1,911 FPE

Summary… the 32 Win Spl is identical at point blank, and it then begins to lag behind the 30-30 shortly thereafter.  I personally refute all claims that the 32 WS is a “better” cartridge.

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May 2, 2024 - 6:00 pm
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Sometimes I indulge myself in embracing Winchester’s original promotional material about the .32 Special.  It’s quite enjoyable.  My family’s hunting experience with the .32 Special has not served to refute any of Winchester’s claims.  However, I don’t claim that had we been using .30 WCF’s rather than .32 Specials, less deer would have been harvested.  

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May 2, 2024 - 6:13 pm
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steve004 said
Sometimes I indulge myself in embracing Winchester’s original promotional material about the .32 Special.  It’s quite enjoyable.  My family’s hunting experience with the .32 Special has not served to refute any of Winchester’s claims.  However, I don’t claim that had we been using .30 WCF’s rather than .32 Specials, less deer would have been harvested.  

  

That is exactly what it was “promotional material”… but it worked, as Winchester sold more than 500,000 lever-action rifles chambered for the 32 W.S.

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May 2, 2024 - 8:41 pm
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As an experienced reloader, bullet caster and shooter of both cartridges I can assure you there are very few differences between the 30WCF and the 32WS, most are on paper. They will never be noticed in the field and likely not on the range. I think the 32WS was an attempt to cater to the “old school” shooters who weren’t quite ready to transition to the new smokeless powder cartridges. 
That said for me and a few other like-minded (hardheaded) folks around here the 32WS will always be “Special”.

 

Mike

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May 2, 2024 - 11:26 pm
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Bert H. said

mrcvs said

It’s essentially a .30-30, but improved.

That is debatable.  Both cartridges were loaded with a 170-gr flat-point bullet, and at nearly identical muzzle velocities.  Because the .308 bullet used in the 30 WCF has a higher BC, it also has better down-range performance as compared to the 32 W.S. (flatter shooting). When it comes to the ammo, it is much easier to find 30-30 than it is 32 Win Spl.  For those reasons, the 30-30 Win will forever dominate the 32 Win Spl in the market place.

In my research survey of the Model 94 (1932 – 1963) the following tables document the caliber production;

Model-94-Caliber-Production-1.jpgImage EnlargerModel-94-Caliber-Production-2.jpgImage Enlarger

 

Bert

Yes, hands down, the .30 WCF round is a lot easier to find than .32 Special.  Now that you mention it this way, there’s not much advantage, if any, of .32 Special so it’s surprising it was developed only 7 years after.30 WCF for no apparent advantage.

How do these two rounds compare to .303 Savage?  I always think of the .303 Savage as the superior of the 3, but that might be psychological and not based in fact.  I would imagine the sheer popularity of .30 WCF makes it the clear winner!

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May 2, 2024 - 11:31 pm
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I use quite a few cast bullets and as I load both .32 Special and .32-40, I do a good bit of bullet interchanging.

I believe my family’s use of he .32 Special dates back to my Dad’s oldest brother.  Also, my Dad’s oldest sister’s husband had a .32 Special real early.  It was the first deer rifle he ever bought and and he never felt the need to buy another deer rifle.

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May 3, 2024 - 2:04 am
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mrcvs said

Bert H. said

mrcvs said

It’s essentially a .30-30, but improved.

That is debatable.  Both cartridges were loaded with a 170-gr flat-point bullet, and at nearly identical muzzle velocities.  Because the .308 bullet used in the 30 WCF has a higher BC, it also has better down-range performance as compared to the 32 W.S. (flatter shooting). When it comes to the ammo, it is much easier to find 30-30 than it is 32 Win Spl.  For those reasons, the 30-30 Win will forever dominate the 32 Win Spl in the market place.

In my research survey of the Model 94 (1932 – 1963) the following tables document the caliber production;

Model-94-Caliber-Production-1.jpgImage EnlargerModel-94-Caliber-Production-2.jpgImage Enlarger

Bert

How do these two rounds compare to .303 Savage?  I always think of the .303 Savage as the superior of the 3, but that might be psychological and not based in fact.  I would imagine the sheer popularity of .30 WCF makes it the clear winner!

Per the source I found, the 303 Savage factory load was a .311 diameter 190-gr bullet at 1,980 FPS and 1,650 FPE.  In my opinion, that would make it slightly inferior to the 30 WCF and 32 WS from a ballistics standpoint. 

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May 3, 2024 - 2:38 am
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I suppose I’m not very sympathetic with the “hard to find” argument regarding the 32WS. I started scrounging 32WS brass several years ago, as soon as I bought my first rifle in that chambering. I likely have all I need but must admit I did a quick inventory when Don posted his brass for sale. 32WS brass isn’t as durable as some but I think I’m good. Come to think of it I don’t believe I’ve ever bought 32WS off the shelf. I started buying 30WCF ammo many years ago when it was $7.50 a box or less, I never bothered to load for 30WCF until about 10 years ago, I didn’t even have a set of dies. I have more 30WCF moulds than I do 32WS, mainly because the Accurate 322170A and Ranch Dog 323170 moulds work better than any of my 30WCF moulds. 
32WS brass may in theory be formed from 30WCF brass but one of my rules is to use correct headstamp brass when I own rifles in very similar chamberings and load for both. 
My point, as best I can remember, is that if you’re going to shoot obsolete rifles using obsolete center fire cartridges and you don’t reload you may want to give it a try. Many of the cartridges I load cost $2-4 EACH new IF you can find them. You don’t need a dedicated loading room filled with thousands of dollars worth of components, dies, moulds, furnaces, scales and presses to make your own ammo. Every reloader started out with a basic setup and today it makes a lot more sense than when I started over forty years ago.

 

Mike

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May 3, 2024 - 3:06 am
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TXGunNut said Every reloader started out with a basic setup and today it makes a lot more sense than when I started over forty years ago. 

I started with one of these while in HS, for a .38 Spl revolver my father gave me.  Not exactly designed for “high production,” but, as I knew no one to show me the ropes, anything more complicated would have been too intimidating for me to even get started.  Now I wonder what happened to my set, as I never throw anything away; it just “disappeared” after two doz relocations over several diff states.

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May 3, 2024 - 2:42 pm
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I’ve often been tempted but have held back at expanding my resume to bullet casting.  Already, reloading turned out to be a Lay’s potato chip phenomenon.  One set of dies over 40 years ago, turns into… well, more than that.  At least with reloading, one set of dies about does it.  With bullet molds, many bullets molds often get added for the same caliber.  So… before you know it, your house weighs thousands of pounds more.  I have friends who cast and they also love to keep finding lead to melt into ingots and stacking those ingots (to keep in reserve).  When the time comes to move to a condo in Florida, they face quite the challenge.

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May 3, 2024 - 6:09 pm
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According to the Barnes manual 6th Ed.  He thinks the 30-30 is better than the 32 SPL.  “If there is such a thing as an unnecessary cartridge the 32 Special would certainly cop the prize”.

Depending on the powder used, here is some data.  The page 68 and 54 data is all at the muzzle, not down range like page 143.

Page 143                                 Page 68                        Page 54

32 Spl 170 gr.                          32 Spl 170 gr.                 30-30           

 MV         2112     ME   1945         MV        ME               MV        ME

100 yds   2220            1860         2160      1765            2410      1930  FL

200 yds   1471            816           2250      1920            2220      1860  FL

300 yds   1237            578           2280      1960  FL

400 yds.  994             374

Unfortunately there is no down range data for the 30-30?

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May 3, 2024 - 6:29 pm
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Chuck said
According to the Barnes manual 6th Ed.  He thinks the 30-30 is better than the 32 SPL.  “If there is such a thing as an unnecessary cartridge the 32 Special would certainly cop the prize”.

Depending on the powder used, here is some data.  The page 68 and 54 data is all at the muzzle, not down range like page 143.

Page 143                                 Page 68                        Page 54

32 Spl 170 gr.                          32 Spl 170 gr.                 30-30           

 MV         2112     ME   1945         MV        ME               MV        ME

100 yds   2220            1860         2160      1765            2410      1930  FL

200 yds   1471            816           2250      1920            2220      1860  FL

300 yds   1237            578           2280      1960  FL

400 yds.  994             374

Unfortunately there is no down range data for the 30-30?

  

I will confess I think the .32 Remington is a darn unnecessary cartridge Confused

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May 3, 2024 - 6:32 pm
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steve004 said

Chuck said

According to the Barnes manual 6th Ed.  He thinks the 30-30 is better than the 32 SPL.  “If there is such a thing as an unnecessary cartridge the 32 Special would certainly cop the prize”.

Depending on the powder used, here is some data.  The page 68 and 54 data is all at the muzzle, not down range like page 143.

Page 143                                 Page 68                        Page 54

 

32 Spl 170 gr.                          32 Spl 170 gr.                 30-30           

 MV         2112     ME   1945         MV        ME               MV        ME

100 yds   2220            1860         2160      1765            2410      1930  FL

200 yds   1471            816           2250      1920            2220      1860  FL

300 yds   1237            578           2280      1960  FL

400 yds.  994             374

Unfortunately there is no down range data for the 30-30?

  

I will confess I think the .32 Remington is a darn unnecessary cartridge Confused

  

Edit:  but not so much that I haven’t owned them in the Remington M08 and M14.

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May 3, 2024 - 7:17 pm
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I am not knocking the 32 SPL.  If it were antique I’d have one.  On the other hand I do not need a 30-30.  I like the 38-55 and the 32-40 better.   But I’d buy one if an antique with special features was available at a good price.  Most of what I have is unnecessary to most modern shooters.

I have 2-308’s.  One of which I shoot 155 gr bullets with an accuracy load that shoots at 2825 fps.  Modern barrels have a 1:9 twist.  You won’t find my load listed in any manual.  Manual data has way too much lawyer influence.  We gradually and safely find the first signs of pressure then back off to a stable node where the load for a few tenths of a grain stays almost the same FPS.  Your barrel is happy while shooting in the node.  Your groups, ES and SD will tell you the truth.

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