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Looking for a referral to a qualified appraiser
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Omer Causey
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December 4, 2022 - 7:03 pm
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Model 12, 16 gauge, 28″ barrel, full choke, field grade, believe it was built in 1921. Was my father’s gun; maybe his father’s before that. Major value impact is that the buttstock was cut down to shorten the length of pull (maybe for me) sometime before 1960.

I am located between Charlotte, Asheville and Spartanburg. Looking for an appraiser somewhere reasonably close.

Omer Causey

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Kingston, WA
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December 4, 2022 - 7:28 pm
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Hello Omer,

Based on your brief description of the gun, there really is no need to have it appraised.  A standard Field grade Model 12 in 16-gauge with a cut down (shortened) butt stock will not have much (if any) interest or value in the collector market. 

Further, and based on its 1921 manufacture date, it has the shorter 2-9/16″ chamber which makes it unfit (not safe) to shoot with modern 2-3/4″ shells.  That all but eliminates it from the “shooter” market.  The true value of the gun today is in its remaining unaltered parts which I would estimate at approximately $250.

Bert

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December 4, 2022 - 8:13 pm
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An additional detriment to value, unfortunately, is the gauge–my favorite, but now, in our unending era of shortages, hard to find & more expensive than 12 & 20.  My first shotgun was my father’s 16 g. Rem 11, later I bought my own Browning Sweet Sixteen, eventually a Parker V Grade, all gone now.

Could the chamber be reamed to handle modern shells?

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December 4, 2022 - 8:56 pm
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clarence said
 

Could the chamber be reamed to handle modern shells?  

Yes, but it may also need the ejection port opened up. 

The early production 20-ga Model 1912s were chambered for a 2-1/2 shell, and when Winchester standardized the 2-3/4″ 20-ga, many of the early guns had their chambers reamed for the longer shells only to find that the empties were hanging up at the ejection port.  I do not know if the 16-ga guns experienced the same issue, but I suspect that they also may have.

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