Avatar
Please consider registering
Guest
Search
Forum Scope




Match



Forum Options



Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters
Register Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_PrintTopic sp_TopicIcon
Winchester 1894 screws
sp_NewTopic Add Topic
Avatar
Member
WACA Guest
Forum Posts: 81
Member Since:
March 1, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
March 13, 2015 - 8:13 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

Hello,

 

    I never gave this much thought but iv,e been told by a reliable source that the screws heads on the receiver on early 1894,s are case colored.the collector who told me said he discussed this with the late Walt Holstien not sure if that is the correct spelling.The best example of this my friend told me ironically is on the front page of this site it,s a 1894 SRC in 32/40. He had that carbine in his hand some years ago and there was distinct case coloring on the screw heads.i,m i the one of the few that doesn’t know this.I spoke with a restorer and he told me there not case colored ,he told me their charcoal blued.I would like some clarification on this please.

 

  John K.

Confused

Avatar
Wisconsin
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 4256
Member Since:
May 2, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
March 13, 2015 - 11:51 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

John,

I know the 73’s and 94’s had case harden screws to some point after the turn of the century. I have a 1901 94  and a 1903 73 with cased screws. My guess would be when they started to blue  hammer and levers.

Bob

WACA Life Member---
NRA Life Member----
Cody Firearms member since 1991
Researching the Winchester 1873's

73_86cutaway.jpg

Email: [email protected]

Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 344
Member Since:
January 24, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
March 14, 2015 - 12:46 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

John

Yes they case hardened many of the screws on the 94s. Winchester used a different wood to bone ratio on the screws then they did on the levers and hammers. This and they didn’t put a varnish/shellac on the screws, caused the screws to silver quickly.

 

Mike

Avatar
Member
WACA Guest
Forum Posts: 81
Member Since:
March 1, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
March 14, 2015 - 1:16 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

Mike,

 

I looked at a couple of my early near mint 1894,s the earliest with  a 232,000 serial number they both had blued hammer screws the others were worn,did Winchester start bluing these screws when case hardening became a special order after 1901.

 

   John K

Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 344
Member Since:
January 24, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
5
March 14, 2015 - 3:09 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

John

The info that I have dated April 6 1903, shows the hammer screws as being case hardened

 

Mike

Avatar
Member
WACA Guest
Forum Posts: 81
Member Since:
March 1, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
6
March 14, 2015 - 4:09 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

Mike,

 

when do you believe Winchester switched over to blued receiver screws?

 

   john k.

Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 344
Member Since:
January 24, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
7
March 14, 2015 - 12:48 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

John

 

I don’t know

 

Mike

Avatar
Wisconsin
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 4256
Member Since:
May 2, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
8
March 14, 2015 - 4:32 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

John,

In 1916 is when they went to blued lever and hammers so the screws would have gone blue at that time for sure but I don’t know if they would of changed earlier. I have a 1911 model 94 and it kind of looks like they are cased screws but its hard to tell. All Winchester screws were hardened  so if they were blued the bluing didn’t stick as well  so they would wear off quick and look cased.

Bob

WACA Life Member---
NRA Life Member----
Cody Firearms member since 1991
Researching the Winchester 1873's

73_86cutaway.jpg

Email: [email protected]

Avatar
Member
WACA Guest
Forum Posts: 6
Member Since:
February 13, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
9
March 23, 2016 - 9:07 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory sp_QuotePost

Hello,

 I am 30 pages deep in the rifles section looking for a topic that fits what I am doing and since I have not found a specific thread on my topic please pardon my attempt at changing the subject of this thread.

I am in the process of disassembling an early Model 1894 rifle (manufacture date approx 1911) and am having a rough go at removing two screws.

They are the fasteners that secure the carrier guides to the side of the receiver. One of the screws is easily accessed through the loading gate aperture but, someone before me, (a likely phrase but true I swear) has attempted to remove the screw and did a number on the head. I went after it with full zeal and not only further buggered the screw head but also twisted a a 150-03 bit from my magna tip driver set grrrrrr!  At any rate I think I will have to resort to drilling the screw out as I see no other means of removing it.

The screw holding the the guide on the other side of the receiver is pristine and not been tampered with and I’m pretty certain that I know why; there is NO STRAIGHT LINE ACCESS TO IT! The only way I can imagine removing it would be with a stubby bit and a ratchet style wrench but, based on how snug the buggered up screw is, I am not holding out a great deal of hope. 

Is there anyone out there that: A) understands which two fasteners I have described and

                                          B) can assist me in getting these fasteners out so that I can polish and then Case Colour Harden the receiver

Any help in this matter is GREATLY appreciated, and if anyone knows where this topic has appeared previously, please feel free to copy and paste it there as well as letting me know where it is.

Thanks in advance all!

 

WEB   

Avatar
South Texas
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 1040
Member Since:
March 20, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
10
March 23, 2016 - 10:12 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

The cartridge guide screws are hard to get out for the most part.  There are some folks out there that probably have made a screwdriver that is bent to fit into the receiver but I havent gone that far, unless something is broke or in your case your refinishing a gun, there isnt any need to take those out.  That being said, the left guide screw can be accessed through the loading gate area but is still at a bit of an angle. The right guide screw can be accessed though the screw hole of the left cartridge guide screw.  You need a small enough screwdriver to do it plus with the right head so that you dont strip.  Be sure to use some kind of penetrating lubricant on the screw–I use PB Blaster from the auto parts store and others prefer a soak in Kroil.  If the screw head is already messed up you likely going to have to drill out the screw. If you mess up the threads in the process you will have to re-run the threads with the correct tap.  And, if you drill the screw out you will have to find another screw on ebay or Gunbroker to replace it. 

DSC_0245-Copy-3.JPG

1892takedown @sbcglobal.net ......NRA Endowment Life Member.....WACA Member

"God is great.....beer is good.....and people are crazy"... Billy Currington

Avatar
Member
WACA Guest
Forum Posts: 532
Member Since:
December 27, 2007
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
11
March 26, 2016 - 7:24 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

Those screws loosened themselves in one of our 1894 rifles.  I bent and ground two screwdrivers to be able to tighten those screws.  The screwdrivers had differing angled tips in order to make a complete 1/2 turn of the screws.  The screws did snug up, but not as tightly as I would have liked.  If they show signs of backing out again, I might have to use something to temporarily lock them in place.

I doubt that a tight screw could be loosened by my screwdrivers.  The one’s I used were of low quality metal.  And it was difficult to effect pressure on the screws.

Perhaps someone who knows metal, and has a shop could help you with building drivers, or better yet, how ’bout a gunsmith to help you with that problem screw?

Avatar
Member
WACA Guest
Forum Posts: 62
Member Since:
February 2, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
12
March 26, 2016 - 1:50 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

WEB said

Hello,

 I am 30 pages deep in the rifles section looking for a topic that fits what I am doing and since I have not found a specific thread on my topic please pardon my attempt at changing the subject of this thread.

I am in the process of disassembling an early Model 1894 rifle (manufacture date approx 1911) and am having a rough go at removing two screws.

They are the fasteners that secure the carrier guides to the side of the receiver. One of the screws is easily accessed through the loading gate aperture but, someone before me, (a likely phrase but true I swear) has attempted to remove the screw and did a number on the head. I went after it with full zeal and not only further buggered the screw head but also twisted a a 150-03 bit from my magna tip driver set grrrrrr!  At any rate I think I will have to resort to drilling the screw out as I see no other means of removing it.

The screw holding the the guide on the other side of the receiver is pristine and not been tampered with and I’m pretty certain that I know why; there is NO STRAIGHT LINE ACCESS TO IT! The only way I can imagine removing it would be with a stubby bit and a ratchet style wrench but, based on how snug the buggered up screw is, I am not holding out a great deal of hope. 

Is there anyone out there that: A) understands which two fasteners I have described and

                                          B) can assist me in getting these fasteners out so that I can polish and then Case Colour Harden the receiver

Any help in this matter is GREATLY appreciated, and if anyone knows where this topic has appeared previously, please feel free to copy and paste it there as well as letting me know where it is.

Thanks in advance all!

 

WEB   

WEB said

Hello,

 I am 30 pages deep in the rifles section looking for a topic that fits what I am doing and since I have not found a specific thread on my topic please pardon my attempt at changing the subject of this thread.

I am in the process of disassembling an early Model 1894 rifle (manufacture date approx 1911) and am having a rough go at removing two screws.

They are the fasteners that secure the carrier guides to the side of the receiver. One of the screws is easily accessed through the loading gate aperture but, someone before me, (a likely phrase but true I swear) has attempted to remove the screw and did a number on the head. I went after it with full zeal and not only further buggered the screw head but also twisted a a 150-03 bit from my magna tip driver set grrrrrr!  At any rate I think I will have to resort to drilling the screw out as I see no other means of removing it.

The screw holding the the guide on the other side of the receiver is pristine and not been tampered with and I’m pretty certain that I know why; there is NO STRAIGHT LINE ACCESS TO IT! The only way I can imagine removing it would be with a stubby bit and a ratchet style wrench but, based on how snug the buggered up screw is, I am not holding out a great deal of hope. 

Is there anyone out there that: A) understands which two fasteners I have described and

                                          B) can assist me in getting these fasteners out so that I can polish and then Case Colour Harden the receiver

Any help in this matter is GREATLY appreciated, and if anyone knows where this topic has appeared previously, please feel free to copy and paste it there as well as letting me know where it is.

Thanks in advance all!

 

WEB   

Hi,

I had the same problem. I had an old 32WS SRC circa 1911 around 45yrs ago. This that had really no redemption qualities whatsoever. I totally rebuilt it and had the barrel opened to 38-55. I had to change out the cartridge guide rails and ran into the same problem as you. All you have to do is cut off a portion of an allen wrench so it will fit into the receiver. Hollow grind the end into a screwdriver and you’ll be able to get the screw in or out. Just make sure you save it for the next time! BTW I still have that carbine and I think it came out good as or better that the forgeries on the net now Case coloring and all…….

Len

Forum Timezone: UTC 0
Most Users Ever Online: 778
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)
Top Posters:
clarence: 6148
TXGunNut: 4860
Chuck: 4513
1873man: 4256
steve004: 4096
Big Larry: 2290
twobit: 2283
TR: 1690
mrcvs: 1656
Forum Stats:
Groups: 1
Forums: 17
Topics: 12493
Posts: 108472

 

Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 1726
Members: 8711
Moderators: 4
Admins: 3
Navigation