Avatar
Search
Forum Scope




Match



Forum Options



Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters
Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_PrintTopic sp_TopicIcon
Winchester 1892 Used for the American Express Co Stagecoaches as Protector Rifles
sp_NewTopic Add Topic
Avatar
New Member
WACA Guest
Forum Posts: 2
Member Since:
June 15, 2023
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
June 15, 2023 - 4:16 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

I have an antique Winchester model 1892 rifle, circa 1912, that has Am.Ex.Co etched in the stock along with a three digit inventory number stamped in the receiver. I believe this rifle was used for protection on stage coaches. Has anyone ever seen similar, or does anyone have any information about such a rifle?

Avatar
Kingston, WA
Admin
Forum Posts: 11080
Member Since:
April 15, 2005
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
June 15, 2023 - 6:59 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

Hello Ralph,

First, if it is a 1912 production Model 1892, it is not an “antique”.  In order to qualify as an “antique” per Federal regulation, the date of manufacture must be something before January 1st, 1899.

While I am not 100% sure, it is my belief that stages coaches had gone the way of the Do-Do birds by the year 1912.

“As the railroad continued to push westward, stagecoach service became less and less in demand. With the completion of the transcontinental railroad in 1869, transcontinental stage-coaching came to an end.

However, this was not the end of the stagecoach, as it continued to be utilized in areas without railroad service for several more decades. In the end, it was actually, the introduction of the automobile that led to the end of the stagecoach in the early 1900’s.”

I suspect that your Model 1892 may have seen service on the railway routes.

Bert

WACA Historian & Board of Director Member #6571L
High-walls-1-002-C-reduced2.jpg

Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 1803
Member Since:
September 22, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
June 15, 2023 - 8:37 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

Vehicles per 1,000 people in the United States in 1912 was 9.90.  Which is certainly many, many times greater than the number of stagecoaches per 1,000 people in 1912:

https://www.energy.gov/eere/vehicles/fact-841-october-6-2014-vehicles-thousand-people-us-vs-other-world-regions

Avatar
New Member
WACA Guest
Forum Posts: 2
Member Since:
June 15, 2023
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
June 16, 2023 - 8:52 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

Hi Bert,

Thank you for clarifying the Antique standards, I was not aware. Let’s say “Vintage” then. Regarding your statement about stage coaches, I guess my question shifts to what would American Express have used them for in the early 1900s? I shared some images via the link below and I welcome any additional feedback you have. This rifle has been in my family for 50+ years and we’ve always had lots of questions.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wkccxvir30az7nc/AACVGkmcb1Qhu0pR7AW_CfBXa?dl=0

Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 4731
Member Since:
March 31, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
5
June 17, 2023 - 1:41 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory sp_QuotePost

Interesting rifle. Carbine butt and forend but longer barrel and with a different rear sight than expected.  This gun was used by a guard lo guard a shipment. Maybe on a train or some other mode of transportation.  In 1912 it could have been a truck.

https://postalmuseum.si.edu/exhibition/america%E2%80%99s-mailing-industry-industry-segments-financial-services-industry/american-express

Avatar
Kingston, WA
Admin
Forum Posts: 11080
Member Since:
April 15, 2005
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
6
June 17, 2023 - 1:54 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

Ralph Lorenz said
Hi Bert,

Thank you for clarifying the Antique standards, I was not aware. Let’s say “Vintage” then. Regarding your statement about stage coaches, I guess my question shifts to what would American Express have used them for in the early 1900s? I shared some images via the link below and I welcome any additional feedback you have. This rifle has been in my family for 50+ years and we’ve always had lots of questions.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/wkccxvir30az7nc/AACVGkmcb1Qhu0pR7AW_CfBXa?dl=

  

Ralph,

The term that best describes any Winchester manufactured in the years 1899 – 1973 is “Curio & Relic” or simply “C&R”.

I believe that it could have been used as a guard gun on a railway route, or an early form of a Brinks Armored truck.

Bert

WACA Historian & Board of Director Member #6571L
High-walls-1-002-C-reduced2.jpg

Avatar
Kingston, WA
Admin
Forum Posts: 11080
Member Since:
April 15, 2005
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
7
June 17, 2023 - 1:57 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

Chuck said
Interesting rifle. Carbine butt and forend but longer barrel and with a different rear sight than expected.  This gun was used by a guard lo guard a shipment. Maybe on a train or some other mode of transportation.  In 1912 it could have been a truck.

https://postalmuseum.si.edu/exhibition/america%E2%80%99s-mailing-industry-industry-segments-financial-services-industry/american-express

  

Chuck,

Unless I am missing something, it appears to have a standard 20-inch Carbine barrel, and a No. 44A rear sight.

Bert

WACA Historian & Board of Director Member #6571L
High-walls-1-002-C-reduced2.jpg

Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 4731
Member Since:
March 31, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
8
June 17, 2023 - 8:39 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

Bert H. said

Chuck said

Interesting rifle. Carbine butt and forend but longer barrel and with a different rear sight than expected.  This gun was used by a guard lo guard a shipment. Maybe on a train or some other mode of transportation.  In 1912 it could have been a truck.

https://postalmuseum.si.edu/exhibition/america%E2%80%99s-mailing-industry-industry-segments-financial-services-industry/american-express

  

Chuck,

Unless I am missing something, it appears to have a standard 20-inch Carbine barrel, and a No. 44A rear sight.

Bert

  

Looked longer to me in the picture?

Avatar
Kingston, WA
Admin
Forum Posts: 11080
Member Since:
April 15, 2005
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
9
June 17, 2023 - 9:42 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

Chuck said

Bert H. said

 

Chuck,

Unless I am missing something, it appears to have a standard 20-inch Carbine barrel, and a No. 44A rear sight.

Bert

Looked longer to me in the picture?

Optical illusion created by the camera angle.  If you compare the overall barrel length to the forend stock length, it looks perfectly normal.

WACA Historian & Board of Director Member #6571L
High-walls-1-002-C-reduced2.jpg

Forum Timezone: UTC 0
Most Users Ever Online: 778
Currently Online: jolly bill, Maverick, Blueliner, DEEREHART, Ben, Zebulon, M64lvr
Guest(s) 37
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)
Top Posters:
clarence: 6626
TXGunNut: 5265
Chuck: 4731
steve004: 4391
1873man: 4359
Big Larry: 2380
twobit: 2326
mrcvs: 1803
TR: 1738
Forum Stats:
Groups: 1
Forums: 17
Topics: 13025
Posts: 113874

 

Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 1819
Members: 8998
Moderators: 4
Admins: 3
Navigation