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winchester 1885 22 Short low Wall production
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March 4, 2018 - 4:22 am
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I have a chance to pic up one of these made in 1895 with an octagon barrel. Blue is 85%+. Case color is 60%. Wood is high and tight. Bore is great. Were the 22 short non Winder guns harder to find? Does the 22 short hold any value in these guns. Thanks. 

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March 4, 2018 - 5:04 am
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Someone with a lot more knowledge will give a better answer, but I do know that there were many more 1885 in 22 then Winders. I recall it was about 20% of the 22’s were for the program. The term Winder was never actually used by Winchester.

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March 4, 2018 - 8:24 am
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The 22 Short (not including the late production Winder Muskets) was the most common cartridge chambering found in the Model 1885 single shot rifle. The vast majority of them were low-walls, but there were a fair number of them made in the high-wall. I own a high-wall in 22 Short that has a 24-inch No. 3 full octagon barrel, and it is a Take Down.

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March 4, 2018 - 9:37 pm
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mikec said
Bore is great.   

Like Bert said, the chambering is common, but a great bore in .22RF ain’t.

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March 4, 2018 - 11:04 pm
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While droning-on about the virtues of collecting Winchester .22 rim fire rifles I have been referred to as a “great bore”, now I know it was a compliment 😉

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January 22, 2023 - 9:22 am
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Quelqu’un pourrait me renseigner sur le filet du dioptre (visée) basique sur la carabine 1885 US armi en calibre 22 shortConfused

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January 22, 2023 - 6:53 pm
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Tom242 said
Quelqu’un pourrait me renseigner sur le filet du dioptre (visée) basique sur la carabine 1885 US armi en calibre 22 shortConfused

  

Are you asking about the specific sight that was used for the Model 87 Winder Muskets sold to the U.S. Army?  If so, it was a Lyman No. 53 receiver mounted peep sight (attached to the right-hand side)… see the attached picture.

Bert

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January 23, 2023 - 6:58 am
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I think Tom was asking about the exact thread used on the peep hole of the Lyman n°53.

 

I know a modern lyman peep does not screw all the way on a 3rd Winder Musket.

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January 23, 2023 - 6:22 pm
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The Lyman No. 43 receiver sight uses the same thread pitch for the screw in aperture as all other period Lyman tang sights. I do not know what the actual thread size & pitch are, or if the current (modern) Lyman sights use a different thread size.

Bert

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