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SRC's - anyone ever actually use the ring?
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April 1, 2023 - 4:43 pm
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“Carbine with sling ring” (to use the correct Winchester nomenclature).  Who has ever made use of the ring?  For anything?  Or know anyone who used the ring?  And this would include other brands (as illustrated below):

https://i.imgur.com/W2892aV.jpgImage Enlarger

https://i.imgur.com/KCWtQSs.jpgImage Enlarger

https://i.imgur.com/y9xKsLH.jpgImage Enlarger

https://i.imgur.com/9RoZp5c.jpgImage Enlarger

I couldn’t find a photo handy of a Savage SRC here, but I’ve had plenty of them too.  I’ve owned SRC’s for the past nearly 50 years and can say that despite all the various brands of them, I’ve never used the ring for anything but to look at.

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April 1, 2023 - 4:59 pm
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I tried a civil war carbine sling with a 1894 SRC, to see how it handled, but not being a cavalryman during the civil war, I hardly see any use for it, apart from damaging the receiver finish quicker than the ring itself can.

I’ve always assumed that the sling ring was carried over on the 1866 Carbine because of the way carbines were used in the CW, but as Winchester SRC’s never actually got any role in the US cavalry and stayed mainly civilian arms, the ring never got any real use. And it was kept on carbines because “carbines had a sling ring!”

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April 1, 2023 - 5:20 pm
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The paradox is, if I find a carbine, I definitely prefer a ring on it Confused

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April 1, 2023 - 5:29 pm
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It’s amusing to see the later manufactured non-lever action carbines with sling rings.  The Remington M14 slide action is an example.  It would have been fascinating to hear the management discussion when they decided to put a ring on it.  From a utility aspect, I can’t see that there would have been demand from the public.

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April 1, 2023 - 5:32 pm
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Or the occasional rifle ……….

Capture.JPGImage Enlarger

And nope, I can’t say I’ve ever used the ring ……. or the sling…… that doesn’t attach to the ring Frown

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April 1, 2023 - 5:54 pm
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pdog72 said
Or the occasional rifle ……….

Capture.JPGImage Enlarger

And nope, I can’t say I’ve ever used the ring ……. or the sling…… that doesn’t attach to the ring Frown

  

Beautiful piece! For me, the ring is very additive.  On rare occasions we have seen rings on nearly all Winchester rifles.  They routinely add a good bit of value.  In every example I’ve seen, I’ve found it a very appealing aspect. 

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April 1, 2023 - 5:57 pm
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steve004 said

pdog72 said

Or the occasional rifle ……….

Capture.JPGImage Enlarger

And nope, I can’t say I’ve ever used the ring ……. or the sling…… that doesn’t attach to the ring Frown

  

Beautiful piece! For me, the ring is very additive.  On rare occasions we have seen rings on nearly all Winchester rifles.  They routinely add a good bit of value.  In every example I’ve seen, I’ve found it a very appealing aspect. 

  

Let me add, sometimes the ring will letter as a special order feature and sometimes it won’t appear in the letter.  It’s much better than it will letter.

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April 1, 2023 - 6:02 pm
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I guess I always assumed the ring was to tie or otherwise attach the gun to the scabbard while traveling horseback. Hadn’t given it a thought. 

Darrin

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April 1, 2023 - 6:23 pm
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steve004 said For me, the ring is very additive.

Not if you have a constitutional aversion to foolishness in whatever form it takes.  Attaching a moving part that serves no useful purpose, but is detrimental in so far as being a noise-maker, falls into the category of “foolish” for me.

Ask yourself, would you want such a ring attached to your modern rifle? 

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April 1, 2023 - 7:09 pm
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clarence said

steve004 said For me, the ring is very additive.

Not if you have a constitutional aversion to foolishness in whatever form it takes.  Attaching a moving part that serves no useful purpose, but is detrimental in so far as being a noise-maker, falls into the category of “foolish” for me.

Ask yourself, would you want such a ring attached to your modern rifle? 

  

Clarence – as you know, collectors are attracted to rare special order features, so a sling ring attached to a rifle fits the bill well. 

What is interesting is that for decades, rings were standardly attached to a variety of Winchester carbines – in fact – there was a good period of time where to not have the ring attached, was accomplished by special order.  I apply this to your statement regarding the foolishness of attaching a noise maker to a modern rifle.  Back in the day, these SRC’s (e.g. the hundreds of thousands of ’92, ’94 and other carbines) were purchased by the modern men of the day as their modern hunting pieces.  Yet apparently it was the same then as it is now –  the ring was nothing more than a noise maker.  Was there that strong of a nostalgic connection to a sling ring for all of these hundreds of thousands carbine purchasers?  

But you are correct. I’ve owned a couple Browning BLR rifles and would feel ridiculous having a ring put on the receiver.  

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April 1, 2023 - 7:11 pm
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The U.S. Army cavalry carried the carbine with a shoulder sling during the frontier era from approximately 1840-late 1880’s.  See the photo of a reenactor carrying a carbine slung while mounted on his horse.  In this case it’s a Spencer carbine but the idea was the same for Sharps, Springfield, etc.  A thimble on the saddle kept the barrel from flopping about.  The carbine takes a lot of abuse when the horse is at any gait faster than a walk. 

The sling is worn over the left shoulder and a snap connects to the ring on the carbine.  The command “Sling Carbines!” was the order to attach it to the sling prior to mounting the horse.

Oliver Winchester always hoped to get military contracts and the early carbines and muskets were made to meet the specifications in use at the time.  As we know, those military contracts never happened with some exceptions of trial arms or guns sold to foreign governments.

Crazy-Horse-Film-1995-Copy.jpgImage Enlarger

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I call myself a collector as it sounds better than hoarder

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April 1, 2023 - 7:19 pm
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Bill Hockett said
The U.S. Army cavalry carried the carbine with a shoulder sling during the frontier era from approximately 1840-late 1880’s.  See the photo of a reenactor carrying a carbine slung while mounted on his horse.  In this case it’s a Spencer carbine but the idea was the same for Sharps, Springfield, etc.  A thimble on the saddle kept the barrel from flopping about.  The carbine takes a lot of abuse when the horse is at any gait faster than a walk. 

The sling is worn over the left shoulder and a snap connects to the ring on the carbine.  The command “Sling Carbines!” was the order to attach it to the sling prior to mounting the horse.

Oliver Winchester always hoped to get military contracts and the early carbines and muskets were made to meet the specifications in use at the time.  As we know, those military contracts never happened with some exceptions of trial arms or guns sold to foreign governments.

Crazy-Horse-Film-1995-Copy.jpgImage Enlarger

  

Thanks Bill – any examples involving lever action rifles?  It’s interested how this history explains why hundreds of thousands of Winchesters (not to mention Marlin, Savage, Colt, Burgess, Whitney-Kenney etc. etc.) were carried and hunted with an attachment that served no function for anyone who carried it.  I will attest that unless you tie a leather lace around the ring, the ring does act as a noise-maker which is very undesirable for deep woods hunting where shots are often under 50 yards.  The clank of that rings carries a good distance.

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April 1, 2023 - 7:36 pm
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Bill Hockett said
Crazy-Horse-Film-1995-Copy.jpgImage Enlarger

  

That rig is different from others I’ve seen, not that I’ve made any deep study of the subject.  I once had an original CW “boot” that attached close to the saddle, about 8″ long I think, along with the sling snap ring, bought from S&S about 60 yrs ago.  Lucky trooper to have a Spencer!  (Not my color uniform, however.)

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April 1, 2023 - 7:40 pm
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steve004 said

Bill Hockett said

The U.S. Army cavalry carried the carbine with a shoulder sling during the frontier era from approximately 1840-late 1880’s.  See the photo of a reenactor carrying a carbine slung while mounted on his horse.  In this case it’s a Spencer carbine but the idea was the same for Sharps, Springfield, etc.  A thimble on the saddle kept the barrel from flopping about.  The carbine takes a lot of abuse when the horse is at any gait faster than a walk. 

The sling is worn over the left shoulder and a snap connects to the ring on the carbine.  The command “Sling Carbines!” was the order to attach it to the sling prior to mounting the horse.

Oliver Winchester always hoped to get military contracts and the early carbines and muskets were made to meet the specifications in use at the time.  As we know, those military contracts never happened with some exceptions of trial arms or guns sold to foreign governments.

Crazy-Horse-Film-1995-Copy.jpgImage Enlarger

  

Thanks Bill – any examples involving lever action rifles?  It’s interested how this history explains why hundreds of thousands of Winchesters (not to mention Marlin, Savage, Colt, Burgess, Whitney-Kenney etc. etc.) were carried and hunted with an attachment that served no function for anyone who carried it.  I will attest that unless you tie a leather lace around the ring, the ring does act as a noise-maker which is very undesirable for deep woods hunting where shots are often under 50 yards.  The clank of that rings carries a good distance.

  

Steve, I know of an 1876 short rifle in .50-95 Express SN 16710 with a staple and sling ring.  It was a presentation gun from Buffalo Bill Cody to his friend William B. Schneider and is currently in the Cody Firearms museum collection.  Cody also gave Schneider a 1873 short rifle with staple and sling ring, SN 72583.

I call myself a collector as it sounds better than hoarder

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April 1, 2023 - 8:01 pm
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I like having a ring for no apparent reason.  BUT, the wear pattern on the receiver can be used to verify originality sometimes based on wear patterns or lack thereof.

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April 1, 2023 - 8:37 pm
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Bill Hockett said

steve004 said

Bill Hockett said

The U.S. Army cavalry carried the carbine with a shoulder sling during the frontier era from approximately 1840-late 1880’s.  See the photo of a reenactor carrying a carbine slung while mounted on his horse.  In this case it’s a Spencer carbine but the idea was the same for Sharps, Springfield, etc.  A thimble on the saddle kept the barrel from flopping about.  The carbine takes a lot of abuse when the horse is at any gait faster than a walk. 

The sling is worn over the left shoulder and a snap connects to the ring on the carbine.  The command “Sling Carbines!” was the order to attach it to the sling prior to mounting the horse.

Oliver Winchester always hoped to get military contracts and the early carbines and muskets were made to meet the specifications in use at the time.  As we know, those military contracts never happened with some exceptions of trial arms or guns sold to foreign governments.

Crazy-Horse-Film-1995-Copy.jpgImage Enlarger

  

Thanks Bill – any examples involving lever action rifles?  It’s interested how this history explains why hundreds of thousands of Winchesters (not to mention Marlin, Savage, Colt, Burgess, Whitney-Kenney etc. etc.) were carried and hunted with an attachment that served no function for anyone who carried it.  I will attest that unless you tie a leather lace around the ring, the ring does act as a noise-maker which is very undesirable for deep woods hunting where shots are often under 50 yards.  The clank of that rings carries a good distance.

  

Steve, I know of an 1876 short rifle in .50-95 Express SN 16710 with a staple and sling ring.  It was a presentation gun from Buffalo Bill Cody to his friend William B. Schneider and is currently in the Cody Firearms museum collection.  Cody also gave Schneider a 1873 short rifle with staple and sling ring, SN 72583.

  

Bill – 

Those sound two interesting and desirable rifles.  Particularly the .50-95.  I would be fascinated to know the specific thought that when into Bill Cody’s choice to include the sling ring when he special ordered those rifles.

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April 1, 2023 - 10:30 pm
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Here’s a M1876 Merz had many years back.  Very nice rifle with some very nice special order features such as fancy stock and matted barrel.  No mention of the ring in the letter.  I was inclined to agree the ring was original but I didn’t have over $20 grand to indulge myself.  However, I never forgot the rifle.

https://i.imgur.com/vrV5295.jpgImage Enlarger

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April 2, 2023 - 12:26 am
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As a 63 year old single man I can assure you there are useless things that are fun to look at and play with. Sometimes she’ll even cook dinner.

 

Mike

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April 2, 2023 - 12:58 am
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steve004 said

clarence said

steve004 said For me, the ring is very additive.

Not if you have a constitutional aversion to foolishness in whatever form it takes.  Attaching a moving part that serves no useful purpose, but is detrimental in so far as being a noise-maker, falls into the category of “foolish” for me.

Ask yourself, would you want such a ring attached to your modern rifle? 

  

Clarence – as you know, collectors are attracted to rare special order features, so a sling ring attached to a rifle fits the bill well. 

What is interesting is that for decades, rings were standardly attached to a variety of Winchester carbines – in fact – there was a good period of time where to not have the ring attached, was accomplished by special order.  I apply this to your statement regarding the foolishness of attaching a noise maker to a modern rifle.  Back in the day, these SRC’s (e.g. the hundreds of thousands of ’92, ’94 and other carbines) were purchased by the modern men of the day as their modern hunting pieces.  Yet apparently it was the same then as it is now –  the ring was nothing more than a noise maker.  Was there that strong of a nostalgic connection to a sling ring for all of these hundreds of thousands carbine purchasers?  

But you are correct. I’ve owned a couple Browning BLR rifles and would feel ridiculous having a ring put on the receiver.  

  

I read somewhere back before the eastern carbine, if they didn’t want the noise maker they would order a 20” short rifle(no sling ring!) ??

 RickC 

   

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April 2, 2023 - 12:12 pm
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My two cents, I read some where a long time ago that Calvary saddles were equipped with a spring steel hook device that the saddle ring would clip into. Therefore holding the rifle in a manner of a scabbard but more easily and quickly accessed. 

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