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Is this the correct sight?
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December 19, 2022 - 2:29 am
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This is a Winchester 1894 made in 1895, 30-30, takedown.

I just purchased it, and I haven’t gotten to receive it yet.  I was thinking … does this look like the correct version of the lyman tang sight for the 94? I know there are serveral models and someone pointed out it might be the wrong one.

If its not the correct one, where do I buy a vintage No 1? Is my best best just to keep searching gunbroker or something?

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December 19, 2022 - 2:40 am
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The tang sight on that rifle is a correct Lyman No. 1, but you will need to dismount the sight to check the application code stamped on the underside of the sight base to verify that it is “DA”.

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December 19, 2022 - 3:59 am
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Exuma said
 

If its not the correct one, where do I buy a vintage No 1? 

Ebay; GB is the worst choice.  But odds are you won’t have reason to look for another.

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December 19, 2022 - 4:52 am
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clarence said

Exuma said

 

If its not the correct one, where do I buy a vintage No 1? 

Ebay; GB is the worst choice.  But odds are you won’t have reason to look for another.

  

Thanks I hate GB too, I just didnt even think to check ebay. Thanks!

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December 19, 2022 - 12:00 pm
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Wow, I thought I was the only one who despised Gunbroker.  No bargains to be had there and a great place to hang out if you enjoy paying full retail—or worse!

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December 19, 2022 - 12:55 pm
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mrcvs said
Wow, I thought I was the only one who despised Gunbroker.  No bargains to be had there and a great place to hang out if you enjoy paying full retail—or worse!

  

True, but no worse than the big auction houses hyping faked guns, like that infamous “factory engraved” ’94 featured in the last Amoskeag catalog, or the numerous faked ’03 sniper rifles Rock Island has sold.

What GB is good for (the only thing!) is getting a rough idea of current values for items you know little about.  If you average several “sold” prices, then deduct, say, 25%, you’ll be in the ballpark.

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December 19, 2022 - 4:05 pm
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clarence said

mrcvs said

Wow, I thought I was the only one who despised Gunbroker.  No bargains to be had there and a great place to hang out if you enjoy paying full retail—or worse!

  

True, but no worse than the big auction houses hyping faked guns, like that infamous “factory engraved” ’94 featured in the last Amoskeag catalog, or the numerous faked ’03 sniper rifles Rock Island has sold.

What GB is good for (the only thing!) is getting a rough idea of current values for items you know little about.  If you average several “sold” prices, then deduct, say, 25%, you’ll be in the ballpark.

  

Out of curiosity what would you say the gun I got is worth? I almost don’t want to know (because I got it to shoot and to have fun and not to sell later), but part of me also wants to know.

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December 19, 2022 - 4:11 pm
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December 19, 2022 - 4:26 pm
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Exuma said
Out of curiosity what would you say the gun I got is worth? I almost don’t want to know (because I got it to shoot and to have fun and not to sell later), but part of me also wants to know.

  

Bert is the value expert, but any “antique” classified gun (pre-1899) would be worth a good deal more to me than the same gun subject to the legal restrictions of a modern gun.  Originality of the sights would have an important bearing.  I especially like its clean condition–honest wear, used with care but not abused.  If I were offered the choice of this gun or one just like it in sparkling mint cond. under the condition that I could never sell it, without hesitation I’d choose yours.  Guns “too good to shoot & handle,” I have NO use for.  (What say you Rick?)

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December 19, 2022 - 4:34 pm
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clarence said

Exuma said

Out of curiosity what would you say the gun I got is worth? I almost don’t want to know (because I got it to shoot and to have fun and not to sell later), but part of me also wants to know.

  

Bert is the value expert, but any “antique” classified gun (pre-1899) would be worth a good deal more to me than the same gun subject to the legal restrictions of a modern gun.  I especially like its clean condition–honest wear, used with care but not abused.  If I were offered the choice of this gun or one just like it in sparkling mint cond. under the condition that I could never sell it, without hesitation I’d choose yours.  Guns “too good to shoot & handle,” I have NO use for.  (What say you Rick?)

  

Wow that makes me feel good. Thanks for saying that.

One time I bought a gun and it didn’t match the photos. It wasn’t deceiving, but after I showed the seller he noticed what I was talking about and he was happy to take it back anyway because it  sold for lower than he wanted. Anyway, I showed him some antique guns I liked and he was pointing out how they were not desireable to collectors because they were refinished, or all the bluing was gone etc. He pointed out some other things as well and taught me a bit for maybe 5 minutes. Aside from the obvious near perfect condition guns that are like $15,000 it was a bit hard to tell for the tier below that. The guns that were most collectable looked most boring to me, with always the same stock/same bluing. The ones that had interesting character always seemed to be less valuable.

For this gun, I have no idea if it’s desirable or not. I tend to like the look of things and having fun the most, so if there’s a gun I really like, and it has character, I will put that over raw ‘collector value’, but it’s also cool to know that it does have a bit of that too Cool

Also this is the first non modern/clone lever gun I have bought, so I’m pretty excited.

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December 19, 2022 - 4:38 pm
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Exuma said

For this gun, I have no idea if it’s desirable or not. I tend to like the look of things and having fun the most, so if there’s a gun I really like, and it has character, I will put that over raw ‘collector value’, but it’s also cool to know that it does have a bit of that too Cool

  

More than a bit!   

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December 19, 2022 - 5:55 pm
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clarence said

mrcvs said

Wow, I thought I was the only one who despised Gunbroker.  No bargains to be had there and a great place to hang out if you enjoy paying full retail—or worse!

  

True, but no worse than the big auction houses hyping faked guns, like that infamous “factory engraved” ’94 featured in the last Amoskeag catalog, or the numerous faked ’03 sniper rifles Rock Island has sold.

What GB is good for (the only thing!) is getting a rough idea of current values for items you know little about.  If you average several “sold” prices, then deduct, say, 25%, you’ll be in the ballpark.

  

Gunbroker isn’t even really any good at that. Gunbroker is only really good at providing a venue for finding gun X quickly with little effort.  It fulfills the instant gratification need irrespective of price.  Or a venue to sell a problem firearm to a novice buyer.

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December 19, 2022 - 6:06 pm
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Value of the OPs rifle:

What it has going for it is that it is antique, takedown, has a tang sight, an octagon barrel, and has its original finish—note even the forge marks are present.

What it has going against it is that it exhibits heavy wear and is in a less desirable caliber for an early rifle.  Most prefer .38-55 or .32-40 over .30 WCF.

My guess is at auction this might bring $1250 – $1500 and $2500 at retail.

Bert would have a more precise and educated answer, however.

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December 19, 2022 - 6:08 pm
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mrcvs said
Value of the OPs rifle:

What it has going for it is that it is antique, takedown, has a tang sight, an octagon barrel, and has its original finish—note even the forge marks are present.

What it has going against it is that it exhibits heavy wear and is in a less desirable caliber for an early rifle.  Most prefer .38-55 or .32-40 over .30 WCF.

My guess is at auction this might bring $1250 – $1500 and $2500 at retail.

Bert would have a more precise and educated answer, however.

  

awesome, thanks for that breakdown. What are forge marks? Also, why do most antique winchesters have horizontal scratches on the receiver? I notice many of them have the exact same scratches.

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December 19, 2022 - 6:15 pm
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Not all Winchesters have the forge marks.  But a lot of Winchesters made during this time period do.  It was the type of blueing process being put on this type of steel.  Although the gun would look better without the marks it does show authenticity.

What is the sight in the barrel dove tail?  Is it a #6?  No matter how this gun letters the tang sight and the fold down sight on the gun are better than stock.

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December 19, 2022 - 6:17 pm
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Exuma said

mrcvs said

Value of the OPs rifle:

What it has going for it is that it is antique, takedown, has a tang sight, an octagon barrel, and has its original finish—note even the forge marks are present.

What it has going against it is that it exhibits heavy wear and is in a less desirable caliber for an early rifle.  Most prefer .38-55 or .32-40 over .30 WCF.

My guess is at auction this might bring $1250 – $1500 and $2500 at retail.

Bert would have a more precise and educated answer, however.

  

awesome, thanks for that breakdown. What are forge marks? Also, why do most antique winchesters have horizontal scratches on the receiver? I notice many of them have the exact same scratches.

  

Those horizontal scratches are the forge marks.  They aren’t scratches but are created during forging.  A refinished receiver would usually lack these.

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December 19, 2022 - 6:20 pm
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mrcvs said

Exuma said

mrcvs said

Value of the OPs rifle:

What it has going for it is that it is antique, takedown, has a tang sight, an octagon barrel, and has its original finish—note even the forge marks are present.

What it has going against it is that it exhibits heavy wear and is in a less desirable caliber for an early rifle.  Most prefer .38-55 or .32-40 over .30 WCF.

My guess is at auction this might bring $1250 – $1500 and $2500 at retail.

Bert would have a more precise and educated answer, however.

  

awesome, thanks for that breakdown. What are forge marks? Also, why do most antique winchesters have horizontal scratches on the receiver? I notice many of them have the exact same scratches.

  

Those horizontal scratches are the forge marks.  They aren’t scratches but are created during forging.  A refinished receiver would usually lack these.

  

Learn something new every day! I just went and found another thread about them, that is fascinating.

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December 19, 2022 - 6:20 pm
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mrcvs said
What it has going against it is that it exhibits heavy wear and is in a less desirable caliber for an early rifle.  Most prefer .38-55 or .32-40 over .30 WCF.

  

Of course it’s a highly subjective judgement, but I think “heavy” wear would be better justified for a gun with no finish left at all, whereas this one has good blue remaining on rcvr.  The pattern of wear on this gun is rather unusual; I wonder if it could have been caused by much use in & out of a saddle scabbard?  And for a ’94 I intended to shoot, I’d damn sure choose .30 WCF over those hard to find cartridges.

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December 19, 2022 - 6:22 pm
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clarence said

mrcvs said

What it has going against it is that it exhibits heavy wear and is in a less desirable caliber for an early rifle.  Most prefer .38-55 or .32-40 over .30 WCF.

  

Of course it’s a highly subjective judgement, but I think “heavy” wear would be better justified for a gun with no finish left at all, whereas this one has good blue remaining on rcvr.  The pattern of wear on this gun is rather unusual; I wonder if it could have been caused by much use in & out of a saddle scabbard?  And for a ’94 I intended to shoot, I’d damn sure choose .30 WCF over those hard to find cartridges.

  

Just for the sake of my learning, can you explain just a little about which wear patterns are usual/unusual? This thread is very helpful by the way, thank you all eternally!

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December 19, 2022 - 6:26 pm
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From a dealers standpoint an antique 38-55 is the most resell-able caliber.  But Clarence is right that the 30 WCF is much easier to find if you are a shooter.  I just saw some boxes of 30-30 at Gunrunners.  The 32-40 and 38-55 Marlin/Ballard cartridges were used by a lot of target shooters. 

Since I reload I shoot 38-55’s and 32-40’s.  I did own a 30-30 once and would buy another one under the right conditions.

Your gun has a lot of high point wear.  I’m not sure if it is unusual?

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