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Impressive final bid price on a .33 WCF
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May 25, 2021 - 11:44 pm
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I didn’t think this would would get this high.  As much as I like .33’s, I am well aware collector’s are generally minimally interested in them.  This usually translates to lower sale prices.  Not with this one:

https://www.gunbroker.com/item/900737911

I don’t want to talk negatively about the rifle – I would enjoy owning it – but to me, it’s sort of beat up.  I am interested in other’s thoughts about the magazine length.  The Cody letter specifies 2/3 Magazine.  I don’t see how that magazine could possibly be any shorter than it is.

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May 26, 2021 - 12:51 am
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Steve,

That rifle has a standard 1/2 length Take Down magazine.  It is possible that the person who entered it in the records made a mistake when they recorded it, or it was replaced at a later date, but we will never know the true answer.  I too am somewhat surprised by the final bid on it.

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May 26, 2021 - 2:39 am
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Steve,  I kind of like the .33’s as well, and would like to have had this one.  But likely not at the price.  And for the amount of blue, etc, it does seem to have had some unfortunate experiences as depicted in the receiver and the forend.  My thoughts at least.  Be really curious as to the bore condition, although can’t say the .33’s generally have bad bores.  Tim

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May 26, 2021 - 2:57 am
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I don’t mean to change the subject, but I think this one should have sold for a fair amount more in my opinion. I was very tempted to bid, but I already  have an 1886 takedown exactly like it in almost the same condition also in 40-82.  It was a gift from my dad’s collection.  

https://www.gunbroker.com/item/900618048

Don

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May 26, 2021 - 3:46 pm
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deerhunter said
I don’t mean to change the subject, but I think this one should have sold for a fair amount more in my opinion. I was very tempted to bid, but I already  have an 1886 takedown exactly like it in almost the same condition also in 40-82.  It was a gift from my dad’s collection.  

https://www.gunbroker.com/item/900618048

Don  

I think (and know) that there were several of us around here who were aware of the .40-82.  It did have some wonderful condition.  I would have enjoyed owning it.  Actually, even more than that the .33 we’ve been discussing.  You’re fortunate to have the one you have.  That brings up a funny quirk about collecting.  I think had I owned the one you have, I would have felt even more inspired to bid on this one.  If they are desirable pieces, I love duplicates!  Even triplicates!  Cool

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May 26, 2021 - 4:55 pm
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steve004 said

I think (and know) that there were several of us around here who were aware of the .40-82.  It did have some wonderful condition.  I would have enjoyed owning it.  Actually, even more than that the .33 we’ve been discussing.  You’re fortunate to have the one you have.  That brings up a funny quirk about collecting.  I think had I owned the one you have, I would have felt even more inspired to bid on this one.  If they are desirable pieces, I love duplicates!  Even triplicates!  Cool  

I’ll probably be kicking myself for not bidding on that one, but I’ve been holding out for a decent 1894 trapper carbine to add to my collection, but haven’t found one yet.  With my limited funds I have to focus on what I’m really looking for–can’t afford to have them all.

Don

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May 26, 2021 - 5:28 pm
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This brings to mind the old joke about the Winchester collector and his wife.  The collector comes home with his latest acquisition and the (savvy) wife says, “don’t you have one identical to this one?”  And the collector responds (with a serious face), “well no, this one has a different serial number.”  

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May 27, 2021 - 3:04 am
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I’d be proud to own either of these 1886’s. Both violate my “no new cartridges” rule but rules are meant to be broken. 

And Steve; your post reminds me of the collector who told a trusted friend in the event of his demise not to let his wife sell his guns for what he told her he paid for them. 

 

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May 27, 2021 - 3:32 am
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steve004 said
I didn’t think this would would get this high.  As much as I like .33’s, I am well aware collector’s are generally minimally interested in them.  This usually translates to lower sale prices.  Not with this one:

https://www.gunbroker.com/item/900737911

I don’t want to talk negatively about the rifle – I would enjoy owning it – but to me, it’s sort of beat up.  I am interested in other’s thoughts about the magazine length.  The Cody letter specifies 2/3 Magazine.  I don’t see how that magazine could possibly be any shorter than it is.  

It does have it’s share of knicks and dings even for a rifle 109 years old. 

IMG_0805-Copy-Copy-Copy.JPG

Winchester Model 1873 44-40 circa 1886

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May 27, 2021 - 7:11 pm
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I really don’t see a problem with either gun’s selling price.  I collect all models and watch the selling prices as much as I can.  $4,000 to $5000 seams to be the range guns in this condition are bringing.  Whether the price is right or wrong is anyone’s opinion. Caliber and antique status are only important to a re saler.  A true collector collects what he likes.

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May 29, 2021 - 12:28 am
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Hammer prices on similar 1886s I was bidding on (and lost) at the recent RIAC Premier auction were comparable until you add their 15% bidder’s premium and the other nickel and dime charges.  Not just the few lots on which I had bid, but all of the other lots that didn’t make my “final cut” sold well above the high estimate, often by 50%.

I’m looking seriously at an 1886 in a current Gunbroker auction that fits my budget (well below what it would take to buy either of the referenced above).  This 1886 is a “collector” piece only because of the brand and certain features, but condition-wise would not qualify  I quickly learned that collecting Winchesters is the sport of kings and decided to love patina and evidence of careful use rather than continue be on the outside looking in.  Given that definition of what I like, maybe I also qualify as a true collector.

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May 29, 2021 - 1:21 am
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[email protected] said
Hammer prices on similar 1886s I was bidding on (and lost) at the recent RIAC Premier auction were comparable until you add their 15% bidder’s premium and the other nickel and dime charges.  Not just the few lots on which I had bid, but all of the other lots that didn’t make my “final cut” sold well above the high estimate, often by 50%.

I’m looking seriously at an 1886 in a current Gunbroker auction that fits my budget (well below what it would take to buy either of the referenced above).  This 1886 is a “collector” piece only because of the brand and certain features, but condition-wise would not qualify  I quickly learned that collecting Winchesters is the sport of kings and decided to love patina and evidence of careful use rather than continue be on the outside looking in.  Given that definition of what I like, maybe I also qualify as a true collector.  

I think there is added safety in these type guns.  Not only are they much less expensive but there is much less likelihood of fakery as often found with the high dollar pieces.

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May 29, 2021 - 5:37 pm
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Good point about fakery at that level, but I do reject non-originality – anything inconsistent with the gun’s serial number.  That’s a personal quirk – I have no expectations regarding future value.

I have a collection of pre-WWII Colt revolvers in no less than 99% condition (from years ago when those were affordable) that I admire, but seldom handle and would never actually shoot!  Unlike those Colts, I can actually “play” with my Winchesters, encouraging “non-gun people” to get their look and feel by handling them, or taking them to the range without concern over jeopardizing my “investment.”

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May 29, 2021 - 5:52 pm
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[email protected] said
Hammer prices on similar 1886s I was bidding on (and lost) at the recent RIAC Premier auction were comparable until you add their 15% bidder’s premium and the other nickel and dime charges.  Not just the few lots on which I had bid, but all of the other lots that didn’t make my “final cut” sold well above the high estimate, often by 50%.

I’m looking seriously at an 1886 in a current Gunbroker auction that fits my budget (well below what it would take to buy either of the referenced above).  This 1886 is a “collector” piece only because of the brand and certain features, but condition-wise would not qualify  I quickly learned that collecting Winchesters is the sport of kings and decided to love patina and evidence of careful use rather than continue be on the outside looking in.  Given that definition of what I like, maybe I also qualify as a true collector.  

Ditto. I can’t afford the high end guns and they would just sit in the safe anyway for fear of messing up the finish. I like to shoot, and don’t have to worry about a dent or a scratch. All of mine see range time and some time in the field. I don’t like real ugly guns either, just somewhere in between.  1st thing I do when considering a gun is a looky down the bore. If it’s pitted I don’t have any use for it. Other people’s tastes I’m sure differ. I must say I enjoy looking at the high end stuff, but they are for somebody else to collect.

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May 29, 2021 - 5:55 pm
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[email protected] said
Good point about fakery at that level, but I do reject non-originality – anything inconsistent with the gun’s serial number.  That’s a personal quirk – I have no expectations regarding future value.

I have a collection of pre-WWII Colt revolvers in no less than 99% condition (from years ago when those were affordable) that I admire, but seldom handle and would never actually shoot!  Unlike those Colts, I can actually “play” with my Winchesters, encouraging “non-gun people” to get their look and feel by handling them, or taking them to the range without concern over jeopardizing my “investment.”  

Yes, I was referring to pieces with normal finish wear vs. alterations. 

And, 99%+ condition guns come with their own anxieties.  

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May 29, 2021 - 9:24 pm
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steve004 said
I didn’t think this would would get this high.  As much as I like .33’s, I am well aware collector’s are generally minimally interested in them.  This usually translates to lower sale prices.  Not with this one:

https://www.gunbroker.com/item/900737911

I don’t want to talk negatively about the rifle – I would enjoy owning it – but to me, it’s sort of beat up.  I am interested in other’s thoughts about the magazine length.  The Cody letter specifies 2/3 Magazine.  I don’t see how that magazine could possibly be any shorter than it is.  

I believe Austin, as does Chayns1969, typically get top dollar for their firearms as collectors have developed a confidence that their offerings are correct as described thus willing to pay more. 

IMG_0805-Copy-Copy-Copy.JPG

Winchester Model 1873 44-40 circa 1886

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