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here's something you don't see everyday
February 19, 2013
10:07 am
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February 19, 2013
10:31 am
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I have a question about that rifle. In the photo that shows the model and caliber stamp (Model 92 Winchester 25-20), the impressions inside the letters seems to be blued. Is that correct? Also, in the same photo, where the forestock meets the receiver, the metal seems to be proud of the wood. The edges of the wood curve down to below the level of the metal. The Model 92 barrel is too late for the receiver.

February 19, 2013
10:39 am
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May 5, 2009
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has the wrong barrel stamp for the serial #

February 19, 2013
11:09 am
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August 1, 2009
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Didn't this same gun make the rounds on this forum before? I remember commenting on how "pristine white" the tag appeared for something so old.

February 19, 2013
11:27 am
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March 20, 2009
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Hello,

This rifle has been for sale for over 2 years. It goes away for a qhilw and then comes back again. As Rex pointed the barrel is totally incorrect for the SN of the rifle. The model designation stamp on the barre ldid not occur for another 400,000 rifles. The only thing that has changed is that the price is about $1200 higher than the last time I saw it.

Michael

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Model 1892 / Model 61 Collector, Research, Valuation

February 19, 2013
11:50 am
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I was searching for something else when I ran across this rifle and thought it was suspicious. I can't believe someone would try to pass this off as all original. That's a lot of money.

February 19, 2013
6:00 pm
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November 12, 2011
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Another red flag I remember from the last time this rifle was discussed is the label on the box.....Winchester and Western didn't merge until 1931.

February 21, 2013
12:26 am
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January 21, 2009
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Whut a deal . . . . 😕 . . . for only $ 18,000 . . . . . Wink

March 16, 2013
10:10 pm
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March 6, 2011
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For NIB, that tang screw sure is not right.

March 17, 2013
5:46 pm
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January 19, 2013
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Hey now don't be so hard on the guy we all make mistakes. I'm sure he just got the photos mixed up with his OTHER NIB Model 92 he has. Easy mix up.

see its easy to explain how these things happen. LOL

March 19, 2013
12:51 pm
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December 3, 2012
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I don't believe people in 1910 were buying firearms for investment purposes. I would have to say its been reworked and rebarreled. Not to say it isn't a beautiful firearm, but NIB is a hard fact to swallow on a firearm that's 113 years old. my apologies.. 103 years old

March 19, 2013
7:33 pm
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I'm with you guys on this one. Don't think it's right. BUT, I have seen a '92 Winchester that was new in the box. The gun had been given to an old man I knew by his father, who bought it new. I don't know why it was never used, but it had been in the family since about 1918, I think. I saw the rifle in the late 1970's, but lost track of it after the man died. He had sold it, but his widow could not remember who bought it. There's a long story about why I didn't get a shot at it, but I won't go into that now. Put's me in a bad mood.

March 19, 2013
10:27 pm
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December 22, 2012
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What did the early Winchester boxes look like?

And how were rifles shipped? In cases of 10 (+/-) to wholesalers?

And when did cardboard boxes first come into use?

In 2000, when on vacation in New Mexico, I saw a display of what looked to be unissued Hall breech-loading percussion rifles in a case that was labeled as being original. It was heavily made, of white pine and looked to be specially fitted for the Hall rifles. There were Harpers Ferry markings stenciled on the box, but I recall the box as being otherwise unpainted. I think the box held 8 rifles.

In 1958, when I was in high school, I was in a gun shop in Geneva, NY. The proprietor had just purchased (from Bannerman?) a case of 1870 Trapdoor rifles, .50-70. That case was also of white pine, was painted a dark green outside and was unpainted inside. It held 10 rifles. The case was opened by unscrewing several large wood screws. The rifles were $35 each.

March 20, 2013
5:18 am
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June 11, 2014
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I'm still waiting to stumble upon a factory case of Winchester deluxe 1886's in the attic of some local farmhouse. So far no luck. 8)

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