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July 2, 2022 - 3:31 pm
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Just picked up my first ‘94, always wanted one, S/N 294XXX. See pics below. I’m no expert on these, would would be happy to hear for the group their impressions. Also, open to hearing whether it’s worth taking down for deep cleaning, or at least how far to go. Any watch-outs on these old guns. I’m fairly competent as an amateur gunsmith, but definitely wouldn’t want to mar anything.

High quality pics linked below, I can get better shows of any areas if folks are interested. Trying to add pics below.

Thanks!

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July 2, 2022 - 5:41 pm
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Unless it is all junked up you might not need to take it apart. The action is pretty much open so Gun Scrubber might be sufficient for a good cleaning. This Carbine has a rifle stock on it. I’m too lazy to look up the serial # to date it but looks like a Post War Model 94

How is the bore?

Apparently, this is a barreled rifle.

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July 2, 2022 - 6:09 pm
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The gun was serialized in 1906.

Don’t take it apart, doesn’t look like it needs a deep cleaning. I’d just work on it with a couple q-tips to clean up the nooks and crannies, run a couple oiled patches thru the bore and wipe it down.

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July 2, 2022 - 6:17 pm
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We ask that complete serial numbers be provided when asking for information.  The partial serial number you provided indicates that it is a late 1904 or early 1905 production Model 1894 Sporting Rifle.

The back half of the rifle shows a standard Sporting Rifle configuration.  The front half (barrel, magazine tube, and stock) were originally on a 1946 – 1948 production Model 94 Flat-band Carbine and are not original to the gun.  Accordingly, what you have is a “Frankenchester”.

Bert

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July 2, 2022 - 6:39 pm
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Bert H. said
We ask that complete serial numbers be provided when asking for information.  The partial serial number you provided indicates that it is a late 1904 or early 1905 production Model 1894 Sporting Rifle.

The back half of the rifle shows a standard Sporting Rifle configuration.  The front half (barrel, magazine tube, and stock) were originally on a 1946 – 1948 production Model 94 Flat-band Carbine and are not original to the gun.  Accordingly, what you have is a “Frankenchester”.

Bert

  

Sorry… didn’t know if posting serial numbers were sensitive info or not… 294166… anyone can feel free to add info on this rifle to their databases or historical information collections.

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July 2, 2022 - 6:44 pm
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Also… I pulled the buttstock, inside it’s stamped 294… doesn’t match last 3 on receiver S/N…. Might that have been swapped out also?

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July 2, 2022 - 7:21 pm
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eldplanko said

Bert H. said

We ask that complete serial numbers be provided when asking for information.  The partial serial number you provided indicates that it is a late 1904 or early 1905 production Model 1894 Sporting Rifle.

The back half of the rifle shows a standard Sporting Rifle configuration.  The front half (barrel, magazine tube, and stock) were originally on a 1946 – 1948 production Model 94 Flat-band Carbine and are not original to the gun.  Accordingly, what you have is a “Frankenchester”.

Bert

  

Sorry… didn’t know if posting serial numbers were sensitive info or not… 294166… anyone can feel free to add info on this rifle to their databases or historical information collections.  

S/N 294166 identifies it as a January 1906 production Model 1894.  When evaluating any old Winchester, the serial number is a critical piece of information that enables a more accurate assessment of the gun in question.

In regards to your Model 1894, it is positively a piece-parts rifle.  The assembly numbers stamped on the various parts never match the serial number on a Model 1894.

Stripping this rifle down for a detailed cleaning will not have any negative affect on its value, as it is purely just a “shooter” grade gun.

Bert

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July 2, 2022 - 7:24 pm
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eldplanko said

Bert H. said

We ask that complete serial numbers be provided when asking for information.  The partial serial number you provided indicates that it is a late 1904 or early 1905 production Model 1894 Sporting Rifle.

The back half of the rifle shows a standard Sporting Rifle configuration.  The front half (barrel, magazine tube, and stock) were originally on a 1946 – 1948 production Model 94 Flat-band Carbine and are not original to the gun.  Accordingly, what you have is a “Frankenchester”.

Bert

  

Sorry… didn’t know if posting serial numbers were sensitive info or not… 294166… anyone can feel free to add info on this rifle to their databases or historical information collections.

  

Bert H. said
We ask that complete serial numbers be provided when asking for information.  The partial serial number you provided indicates that it is a late 1904 or early 1905 production Model 1894 Sporting Rifle.

The back half of the rifle shows a standard Sporting Rifle configuration.  The front half (barrel, magazine tube, and stock) were originally on a 1946 – 1948 production Model 94 Flat-band Carbine and are not original to the gun.  Accordingly, what you have is a “Frankenchester”.

Bert

  

Also, just pulled the forestock. Underside of barrel is stamped “.32 WS 47,” I guess that makes it a 1947 front end?

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July 2, 2022 - 7:31 pm
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Bert H. said

eldplanko said

Bert H. said

We ask that complete serial numbers be provided when asking for information.  The partial serial number you provided indicates that it is a late 1904 or early 1905 production Model 1894 Sporting Rifle.

The back half of the rifle shows a standard Sporting Rifle configuration.  The front half (barrel, magazine tube, and stock) were originally on a 1946 – 1948 production Model 94 Flat-band Carbine and are not original to the gun.  Accordingly, what you have is a “Frankenchester”.

Bert

  

Sorry… didn’t know if posting serial numbers were sensitive info or not… 294166… anyone can feel free to add info on this rifle to their databases or historical information collections.  

S/N 294166 identifies it as a January 1906 production Model 1894.  When evaluating any old Winchester, the serial number is a critical piece of information that enables a more accurate assessment of the gun in question.

In regards to your Model 1894, it is positively a piece-parts rifle.  The assembly numbers stamped on the various parts never match the serial number on a Model 1894.

Stripping this rifle down for a detailed cleaning will not have any negative affect on its value, as it is purely just a “shooter” grade gun.

Bert

  

Thanks for your rapid response and detective work!  I bought it for shooting… any historical value was upside!

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July 2, 2022 - 8:13 pm
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At first, I thought it was a Carbine with a rifle stock, but when I looked up the serial number and found the early production and it was not a saddle ring it must be a rifle with a newer barrel.

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July 3, 2022 - 12:34 am
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eldplanko said

Also, just pulled the forestock. Underside of barrel is stamped “.32 WS 47,” I guess that makes it a 1947 front end?  

Yes it does.  As I mentioned earlier, the front end came off of a Flat-band carbine.

Bert

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