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"Cap" Hatfield's M1892 on Pawn Stars
May 19, 2021
2:27 am
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At least there’s a serial number for Michael’s survey.  Michael – did you have this one?  Anyway, here’s a segment from an episode of the show where this guy brings in a ’92 rifle that his great grandfather traded, “Cap Hatfield” a horse for.  As the, “story” goes, Cap was fleeing a McCoy and his horse broke his leg.  He was in need of a horse that didn’t have a broken leg and this fellow’s grandfather was there with one for trade.  

This show is so full of P.S. that it is worth watching for the comedic element.  Rick is in his own gun expert mode and explains that the Winchester M1892 is very rare and basically suggests it was only made from 1892 to 1894 given the Model 1894 came out only two years later.  Then, they bring in the real, “expert” who does examine the gun and proclaims it a real Model 1892.  He does at least sort of explain the concept of how much the gun is worth and how much the, “story” is worth.  By the way, he ascribes a lot more value to both than any of us would.  

Given the Hatfield-McCoy feud is reported to have spanned from 1863 to 1891, selecting a M1892 for their display that was made in 1900 was an interesting choice.  And of course, as Rick has stated on the show, neither he nor his shop holds an FFL.  Hence, it would have been illegal for him to take this in.  However, given he seems to believe the Model 1892 was made from 1892 to 1894, it might just be an honest mistake.

I know, these guys are laughing all the way to the bank.  The fact that less than 1% of the people watching recognize the blunders they make is hardly of an consequence to them.  

ab_channel=PawnStars

May 19, 2021
3:43 am
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 Most idiotic travesty in the history of reality TV, Pawn Stars or Oak Island?  Tough choice.

May 19, 2021
12:53 pm
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It’s a safe bet there are many guns sold by both sides of this feud in later years that had no role in the feud. I’m pretty sure the Hatfields and McCoys to this day are selling “Hatfield” or “McCoy” guns. “Reality” TV, just another reason I no longer watch TV.

 

Mike

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Smokeless powder is a passing fad! -Steve Garbe
I hate rude behavior in a man. I won't tolerate it. -Woodrow F. Call, Lonesome Dove
Some of my favorite recipes start out with a handful of depleted counterbalance devices.-TXGunNut
Presbyopia be damned, I'm going to shoot this thing! -TXGunNut
May 20, 2021
4:28 am
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In our family, my Great-grandfather’s 1873 was at the driving of the Golden Spike. 

Mom proudly related the story with confidence when I was a boy.  She even remembered the relative who had told her of this amazing fact.  I’m certain that if I had asked her, she would have written her tale on paper and would have had it notarized for me.  And I would have been in possession today of an official document that definitely links the rifle to that historic event–serial number and all!

Funny, how a bit of knowledge does change one’s perception.  Sitting in school one day, I just happened to be viewing a photograph of the transcontinental celebration.  I searched the photo for Great-grandpa holding his rifle. No luck.  Then I read the information accompanying the picture.  Hmmmm–May 10, 1869.

I guess Great-grandpa had also invented a time-machine.

We have yet to find his time-machine, but Mom just turned 90 years old and has an excellent memory.  So, I could still go the “letter” route…only trouble is, I ain’t never gonna sell his rifle.

May 20, 2021
12:46 pm
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FromTheWoods said
In our family, my Great-grandfather’s 1873 was at the driving of the Golden Spike. 

Mom proudly related the story with confidence when I was a boy.  She even remembered the relative who had told her of this amazing fact.  I’m certain that if I had asked her, she would have written her tale on paper and would have had it notarized for me.  And I would have been in possession today of an official document that definitely links the rifle to that historic event–serial number and all!

Similar stories handed down by family members “who never told a lie” are exposed routinely on Antiques Roadshow: some piece of antique furniture brought by ancestors from the Old Country in a square-rigger which turns out to have been made in Brooklyn, or something carried across the plains in a Conestoga wagon that dates from the Model T era, & so forth.  “Oral History” is as trustworthy as the dime-novel stories of Buffalo Bill.

May 20, 2021
1:14 pm
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I recall either reading it somewhere or perhaps it was a story told by the guide at the Jesse James homestead in Missouri but supposedly Jesse’s mother Zerelda who lived in the house until 1911 would buy old pistols and sell them at a big markup to visitors telling them that they had belonged to Jesse. I wonder how many of these guns got passed down through the generations with that story attached?

May 20, 2021
2:14 pm
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Dave K. said
I recall either reading it somewhere or perhaps it was a story told by the guide at the Jesse James homestead in Missouri but supposedly Jesse’s mother Zerelda who lived in the house until 1911 would buy old pistols and sell them at a big markup to visitors telling them that they had belonged to Jesse. I wonder how many of these guns got passed down through the generations with that story attached?  

Have heard of the same thing done by retired Texas Rangers & Western Sheriffs; the suckers got signed statements that the gun had been owned & maybe “used” by the ex-officer.  Big market for that kind of bogus “Western history.” 

May 20, 2021
2:19 pm
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Dave K. said
I recall either reading it somewhere or perhaps it was a story told by the guide at the Jesse James homestead in Missouri but supposedly Jesse’s mother Zerelda who lived in the house until 1911 would buy old pistols and sell them at a big markup to visitors telling them that they had belonged to Jesse. I wonder how many of these guns got passed down through the generations with that story attached?  

Like this one.  It was sold at Ward’s Auction a few years ago for a good sum of money.  Somebody believed the story…

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://m.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DLHGcHeskMM0&ved=2ahUKEwjU4dOgu9jwAhVTqZ4KHSlNBRQQz40FegQICxAH&usg=AOvVaw1E7PQJusbSTWpz4YU1Awyb

Don

May 20, 2021
6:50 pm
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Slow down, Don!

I held that one a couple of times in Salem.  I’d like to believe it was Jesse’s!  (I can be a sucker sometimes too.)

Two weeks ago, I watched a video that was made since the auction ended.  Does make one wonder as to the authenticity.  The fellow in the clip who is purported to be the current owner seems quite excited about “Jesse’s” gun and possessing it.

May 20, 2021
7:02 pm
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FromTheWoods said  The fellow in the clip who is purported to be the current owner seems quite excited about “Jesse’s” gun and possessing it.  

The more you pay for any kind of fake, the harder you try to convince yourself it’s real.

May 21, 2021
1:42 am
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“The more you pay for any kind of fake, the harder you try to convince yourself it’s real.”

Wisdom, Clarence.

May 21, 2021
1:48 am
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At one time or another I suspect we’ve all wished a gun could talk but I have a feeling some of these fellers tell better stories.

 

Mike

Life Member TSRA, Endowment Member NRA
BBHC Member, TGCA Member
Smokeless powder is a passing fad! -Steve Garbe
I hate rude behavior in a man. I won't tolerate it. -Woodrow F. Call, Lonesome Dove
Some of my favorite recipes start out with a handful of depleted counterbalance devices.-TXGunNut
Presbyopia be damned, I'm going to shoot this thing! -TXGunNut
May 21, 2021
8:40 pm
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steve004 said
At least there’s a serial number for Michael’s survey.  Michael – did you have this one?  Anyway, here’s a segment from an episode of the show where this guy brings in a ’92 rifle that his great grandfather traded, “Cap Hatfield” a horse for.  As the, “story” goes, Cap was fleeing a McCoy and his horse broke his leg.  He was in need of a horse that didn’t have a broken leg and this fellow’s grandfather was there with one for trade.  

This show is so full of P.S. that it is worth watching for the comedic element.  Rick is in his own gun expert mode and explains that the Winchester M1892 is very rare and basically suggests it was only made from 1892 to 1894 given the Model 1894 came out only two years later.  Then, they bring in the real, “expert” who does examine the gun and proclaims it a real Model 1892.  He does at least sort of explain the concept of how much the gun is worth and how much the, “story” is worth.  By the way, he ascribes a lot more value to both than any of us would.  

Given the Hatfield-McCoy feud is reported to have spanned from 1863 to 1891, selecting a M1892 for their display that was made in 1900 was an interesting choice.  And of course, as Rick has stated on the show, neither he nor his shop holds an FFL.  Hence, it would have been illegal for him to take this in.  However, given he seems to believe the Model 1892 was made from 1892 to 1894, it might just be an honest mistake.

I know, these guys are laughing all the way to the bank.  The fact that less than 1% of the people watching recognize the blunders they make is hardly of an consequence to them.  

ab_channel=PawnStars  

Thanks Steve,

It is a new one for the survey.  The configuration is correct but there was no barrel address or caliber stamp on the barrel that I could see.  I am no fan opf the show or much on TV especially “reality TV.”

Michael

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