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Boiled linseed oil removal from Model 70
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November 6, 2022 - 2:16 pm
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I once asked a reputable source what I could / should do for routine stock maintenance for a pre-war Model 70 in good original condition. The source replied “boiled linseed oil” which I did.

Overall, I hand rubbed fewer than 3 light coats, it might have been just one, I forget. Before I learned more and stopped.

Even with the light BLO application, now the stock has that glossy “sticky” sheen from the oil, vs the satin finish I see on other pre-64’s. It’s faint, not too bad, but I notice it.

It’s probably too late to go back (this was 6 months ago that the BLO was applied). But is there anything I can do to remove, or reduce, the BLO? Without removing the original lacquer finish.

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November 6, 2022 - 3:44 pm
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Even with the light BLO application, now the stock has that glossy “sticky” sheen from the oil, vs the satin finish I see on other pre-64’s.Ron P said
 

Your source omitted one key piece of the proper instructions:  cut the oil 50/50 with turpentine, at least if going over the whole surface; if touching up a scratch down to bare wood, the uncut oil will do.  I think you could have rubbed off most of the oil with paint thinner within a couple of weeks after application, but 6 mos is probably too long; nevertheless, it still might be worth trying–should at least reduce the “stickiness.”  Next thing I’d try if that doesn’t work is methyl alcohol, which I don’t think will attack lacquer if wiped on & off quickly.  Finally as a last resort, if the “stickiness” remains, I’d try one of the generic substitutes for the old (& now defunct) Formbys finish restorer.

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November 6, 2022 - 4:36 pm
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  Clarence, I have a 1894 rifle in 38-55 that someone did the same thing. It’s a nice 80% finish that someone decided to put BLO over real original Winchester finish. He put it on thick enough to make it rope. I bought it for half price, shooter price and hung it on the wall. If there is some way of making the gun right I’m all ears. It’s gotten past the sticky part but I still see the roping. I haven’t done anything since I bought it three years ago because I was afraid to damage the original finish. Ideas appreciated. T/R    

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November 6, 2022 - 4:39 pm
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TR/Clarence: when you say paint thinner to remove the stickiness, are you referring to mineral spirits or something else? Is there a specific product you can recommend? Thank you. 

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November 6, 2022 - 5:16 pm
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Ron P said
TR/Clarence: when you say paint thinner to remove the stickiness, are you referring to mineral spirits or something else? Is there a specific product you can recommend? Thank you. 

  

Yes, mineral spirits, because it’s cheaper than turpentine; all the hardware store brands are equivalent as far as I know.

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November 6, 2022 - 5:23 pm
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TR said It’s gotten past the sticky part but I still see the roping. I haven’t done anything since I bought it three years ago because I was afraid to damage the original finish. Ideas appreciated. T/R    
  

At this point, I don’t think there’s any option left but the Formby’s type finish “restorer,” which isn’t supposed to do more than soften & partially dissolve the old finish when used as directed, not strip it off to bare wood as a methyl chloride stripper would do. No doubt there’s a You Tube video on how best to do, if you don’t remember the old Formby’s TV ads. 

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November 6, 2022 - 5:24 pm
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     Ron P,

 I don’t know how to remove it, I to am looking for help.

 I use Scott’s Liquid Gold on my Model 70’s applied very sparingly with a wool pad. It mask the scratches and wear while bringing back the original look. The effect is temporary, it might have to be repeated after a hunting trip but it has no long term effect on the finish. You can use it on old furniture or old guns. T/R

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November 7, 2022 - 2:21 pm
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T/R and others,  Quite a long time ago (I was still in grade school!) an old gun tinkerer advised to age a shiny finish to use a pad of burlap and rub until you have achieved the satin look you desire.  I had refinished my Remington Model 11 with linseed oil and turpentine.  The burlap seemed to do the trick for me at that time.  Note, old burlap may have dirt and who knows what in it, and seemed to be coarser than the new stuff available now for crafting.  It might work, but for sure try it in an inconspicuous spot to see what you might think.  Tim

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November 7, 2022 - 3:34 pm
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You can use some Kerosene with 0000 steel wool to remove that Linseed Oil. You have to rub very gently so as not to go into the woods patina that is now barried. I would then apply a Danish Oil, I like Watco, to the surface and rub it in to protect it.

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