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High Grade Stocks
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September 18, 2017 - 1:09 am
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This topic begs a question? Who would fake a 9422?  Isn’t upgrading plain stocks with finely figured Walnut stocks  really just building a more finely finished rifle. If I ever sell, not likely, rifles like these will be valued examples of the best of the best. Not really end of production gimmicks to sell the last of.

I have bought three high grade 9422  stocks for my project guns. The first was purchased directly from Winchesters custom shop about 4 months before the New Haven factory was closed.

The second was ordered directly from Browning/Winchester from their 2008 gun parts price list. I was dumb founded that they would sell off $800.00 wood for $300.00

The third was ordered from Midway. 

Each of these stocks cost me more than I paid for the first of my engraving project rifles.  All three have been installed on project guns along with Professional Engraving done by talented engravers. I now have a Champagne  collection of Winchesters assembled on a beer budget. If there is a down side it took fourteen years to complete three rifles. 

 

In any event, my thoughts, whats yours?

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September 18, 2017 - 2:09 am
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Years down the road when its sold and a collector is buying it, he is looking for original condition. Now if you have the original wood and a Winchester invoice for the replacement wood, keep it with the gun and when you sell it, it goes with the gun, now the buyer has the ability to return the gun to original condition. I know if I was buying a old 73 and it had a upgraded stock, it would not be worth as much had it been original even if it was a Winchester stock.

Bob

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73_86cutaway.jpg

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September 18, 2017 - 3:48 am
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1873man said
Years down the road when its sold and a collector is buying it, he is looking for original condition. Now if you have the original wood and a Winchester invoice for the replacement wood, keep it with the gun and when you sell it, it goes with the gun, now the buyer has the ability to return the gun to original condition. I know if I was buying a old 73 and it had a upgraded stock, it would not be worth as much had it been original even if it was a Winchester stock.

Bob  

There’s a good point being made here but let me add this:  a Winchester Model 1873, as other models made in the 19th Century, is a piece of American history and as such there is an implied amount of provenance attached to the rifle.  Whether or not we know the provenance of one of those rifles, there is a certain amount of Americana attached to one of those specimens.  In their day they were used to tame the West, or at the historically famous Creedmor matches, by US and foreign military, or for genuinely putting meat on a frontier table and as a tool for a nation building people.  As such one that is completely original should naturally command a higher value.

On the other hand, the rifles of the late 20th Century will never have any such implied provenance.  They are, by and large, toys made for the recreation of a leisure class.  Looking forward a century I don’t see where they will have any particular allure to our descendants, hence a Model 9422 with a fancy aftermarket addition will probably sell for a little more than a standard production model and I don’t see any particular obsession with originality for these rifles in the future.

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"This is the West, sir. When the legend becomes fact, print the legend." 

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September 18, 2017 - 4:09 am
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I picked the 73 for that reason. Someday the 9422 might fall into that category and the future owner could be saying why did someone do this to a gun just like we talk about a 73 that someone messed with 100 years ago. Guns are collectable and the longer they are around the more they will be worth as mortality take its toll on the them just like the earlier guns. Look at the 94’s with millions made, 30 years ago they were not worth very much but they have taken off and someday the 9422 will follow. I’m not saying you shouldn’t but if you have the original stock, keep it with it.

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I guess the fact that they were produced on the grounds of the original factory before it was shuttled isn’t the same as “The gun that won the West” but from My perspective, finely figured walnut, tasteful engraving and Doug Turnbull case colors pointing  to the end of an era are just as interesting and important.

But, this is America, collectors collect what they like, for what ever reasons suit them and life goes on. Besides if my children like them as much as I do, they will probably inherit them. Maybe they’ll have something something to keep in the family for all times.

 

Time alone will tell. Either way no deception here.  Good cheer and collecting to all.

 

John..

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September 19, 2017 - 1:36 am
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Talk about cheap 22’s with pretty wood. Check out this M47 single shot I just acquired. Nicest piece of wood I have ever seen on a Winchester 22 except for a few M75 Sporters and they were not cheap.   Big LarryM47.jpgImage EnlargerM47-Target.jpgImage Enlarger

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September 19, 2017 - 11:38 pm
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Hi Big Larry:  

Nothing beats a good stick of wood.

Thanks for posting. These sure beat low gradeConfusedhard woods.  

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September 20, 2017 - 12:26 am
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So here is the stock I purchased from the Winchester C9422-winchester-custom-shop-wood.gifImage Enlargerustom shop months before it was shut down in New Haven, Ct. This ultimately was install on the “Sound of Liberty” rifle. 

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