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Here it is, fellow Model 52 collectors: your chance for a "late Sixties to early Seventies" genuine highly collectible 52B Sporting - at a bargain price!
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March 20, 2024 - 7:59 pm
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- Bill 

 

WACA # 65205; life member, NRA; member, TGCA; member, TSRA; amateur preservationist

"I have seen wicked men and fools, a great many of both, and I believe they both get paid in the end, but the fools first." -- David Balfour, narrator and protagonist of the novel, Kidnapped, by Robert Louis Stevenson.

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March 20, 2024 - 8:14 pm
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Don’t you wish you could find another local dealer as sharp as the one who provided the owner this info?  Can’t blame seller for repeating what the “expert” told him.  Current price is close to list price in the ’90s, but they usually bring $800 or so, more with the box that many still have.  The heavy-brl Zander model would be twice that.

Interesting that Miroku restored the “Sporting” marking that Win omitted from the “C” models.

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March 21, 2024 - 1:03 am
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I noticed the “Sporting” floorplate mark, which would be correct for a reproduction of the B model. 

Interestingly, it was Browning that had Miroku first manufacture a reproduction Winchester 52 Sporting but it was made up with a “C” model stock and bore the Browning trademarks, not Winchester’s. The floorplate was also marked “Sporter”, which is doubly incorrect. 

At some point after Fabrique Nationale acquired Browning and the Winchester gunmaking operation, Miroku manufactured the same rifle with Winchester trademarks but with the B styled stock and “Sporting” marked floorplate, as we see in this auctioned rifle. 

I have not personally tested this information but have read both the weight and overtravel screws accessible through the holes in the floorplates of these reproductions (both the Browning and Winchester marked guns) are mechanically inert and ineffective. That is, they adjust nothing.  If anyone knows better, I’d appreciate knowing I’m wrong. 

Although the Browning reproduction is out of manufacture, I’ve read the Winchester version is (or at least was) regularly catalogued.  

I can only report my personal experience but the fit and finish of the Browning/Miroku Winchester model reproductions – which were sold as limited editions – seemed to me to be a bit superior to the same guns manufactured by Miroku and rollmarked Winchester.  When they were first advertised, I had Nix order a new Winchester/Miroku M12, which was very nicely done – styled as a deluxe grade 20 gauge with 26″ ventilated rib, Improved Cylinder barrel. However, when I took it dove hunting on a hot day in West Texas, after the gun warmed up from shooting, the sear interrupter had been fitted too tightly and the gun would lock up after firing. This could have been fixed, of course, but I let it go down the line.  When I later had the chance to buy the Browning-marked equivalent gun, the only difference being the marks and a modified choke, I snatched it up and still have it, as well as a very slick little Browning 42. 

It’s not that I wouldn’t like to own and use a genuine deluxe Winchester M12 20 gauge, the ones I’ve seen with high condition are well above what I’m willing to spend on a pump shotgun, unless it were to be my only shotgun. 

I don’t think these Miroku M12 guns are superior to a post-war deluxe grade M12 made in New Haven, but they are at least equal, if not superior, in workmanship to the several field grade Winchester M12s I’ve owned and re-sold, notably a Heavy Duck and a modified choke 26″ 1950 sixteen gauge.  In fact, after taking both the Browning M12 and the Winchester M12 sixteen gauge dove hunting with my nephew in the brush country, I kept the Browning and sold the Winchester. 

So, I’m not prejudiced against the Miroku reproductions. But I do cherish my genuine 52C Sporting, brazed ramp and all. 

- Bill 

 

WACA # 65205; life member, NRA; member, TGCA; member, TSRA; amateur preservationist

"I have seen wicked men and fools, a great many of both, and I believe they both get paid in the end, but the fools first." -- David Balfour, narrator and protagonist of the novel, Kidnapped, by Robert Louis Stevenson.

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March 21, 2024 - 1:16 am
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Good looking gun as far as I can tell. Looks like they did a lot of things right on this gun. I wouldn’t be surprised to see it bring $1000. 

 

Mike

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March 21, 2024 - 2:02 am
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TXGunNut said
Good looking gun as far as I can tell. Looks like they did a lot of things right on this gun. I wouldn’t be surprised to see it bring $1000. 

 

Mike

  

Concur. Just my opinion but I don’t think these reproductions adversely affect the New Haven originals.  They can serve as placeholders and teaching tools. In the case of some like the Model 52 Sporting, they can bring the design within the reach of a young working man who couldn’t otherwise afford one. 

And eventually, we are going to need young men like that, if not sooner. 

I’m planning on being immortal but I have my doubts about the rest of you….

- Bill 

 

WACA # 65205; life member, NRA; member, TGCA; member, TSRA; amateur preservationist

"I have seen wicked men and fools, a great many of both, and I believe they both get paid in the end, but the fools first." -- David Balfour, narrator and protagonist of the novel, Kidnapped, by Robert Louis Stevenson.

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March 21, 2024 - 2:25 am
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Concur. Just my opinion but I don’t think these reproductions adversely affect the New Haven originals. Zebulon said 

No more than Henry replicas affect the New Haven originals.  I wish I’d bought one of the Mirokus back in the ’90s.  In fact, I wish I’d bought a truck load so I could now be selling them on GB.

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March 23, 2024 - 3:22 pm
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Zebulon said
I noticed the “Sporting” floorplate mark, which would be correct for a reproduction of the B model. 

Interestingly, it was Browning that had Miroku first manufacture a reproduction Winchester 52 Sporting but it was made up with a “C” model stock and bore the Browning trademarks, not Winchester’s. The floorplate was also marked “Sporter”, which is doubly incorrect. 

At some point after Fabrique Nationale acquired Browning and the Winchester gunmaking operation, Miroku manufactured the same rifle with Winchester trademarks but with the B styled stock and “Sporting” marked floorplate, as we see in this auctioned rifle. 

I have not personally tested this information but have read both the weight and overtravel screws accessible through the holes in the floorplates of these reproductions (both the Browning and Winchester marked guns) are mechanically inert and ineffective. That is, they adjust nothing.  If anyone knows better, I’d appreciate knowing I’m wrong. 

Although the Browning reproduction is out of manufacture, I’ve read the Winchester version is (or at least was) regularly catalogued.  

I can only report my personal experience but the fit and finish of the Browning/Miroku Winchester model reproductions – which were sold as limited editions – seemed to me to be a bit superior to the same guns manufactured by Miroku and rollmarked Winchester.  When they were first advertised, I had Nix order a new Winchester/Miroku M12, which was very nicely done – styled as a deluxe grade 20 gauge with 26″ ventilated rib, Improved Cylinder barrel. However, when I took it dove hunting on a hot day in West Texas, after the gun warmed up from shooting, the sear interrupter had been fitted too tightly and the gun would lock up after firing. This could have been fixed, of course, but I let it go down the line.  When I later had the chance to buy the Browning-marked equivalent gun, the only difference being the marks and a modified choke, I snatched it up and still have it, as well as a very slick little Browning 42. 

It’s not that I wouldn’t like to own and use a genuine deluxe Winchester M12 20 gauge, the ones I’ve seen with high condition are well above what I’m willing to spend on a pump shotgun, unless it were to be my only shotgun. 

I don’t think these Miroku M12 guns are superior to a post-war deluxe grade M12 made in New Haven, but they are at least equal, if not superior, in workmanship to the several field grade Winchester M12s I’ve owned and re-sold, notably a Heavy Duck and a modified choke 26″ 1950 sixteen gauge.  In fact, after taking both the Browning M12 and the Winchester M12 sixteen gauge dove hunting with my nephew in the brush country, I kept the Browning and sold the Winchester. 

So, I’m not prejudiced against the Miroku reproductions. But I do cherish my genuine 52C Sporting, brazed ramp and all. 

  

Zebulon,

the Miroku C triggers that both the B & C models have, had an extra roll pin added that limits the amount of travel that the pull weight screw could move. You can knock out the roll pin and adjust the trigger by turning the screw in or out.  Some members say that they have gotten the pull weight  down to about a pound and a half. If you go to Rimfire Central and do a search there for the 52R trigger fix, or 52 Winchester lawyer pin, you will find several topics on it.

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March 24, 2024 - 2:25 pm
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Old-Win said

Zebulon said

I noticed the “Sporting” floorplate mark, which would be correct for a reproduction of the B model. 

Interestingly, it was Browning that had Miroku first manufacture a reproduction Winchester 52 Sporting but it was made up with a “C” model stock and bore the Browning trademarks, not Winchester’s. The floorplate was also marked “Sporter”, which is doubly incorrect. 

At some point after Fabrique Nationale acquired Browning and the Winchester gunmaking operation, Miroku manufactured the same rifle with Winchester trademarks but with the B styled stock and “Sporting” marked floorplate, as we see in this auctioned rifle. 

I have not personally tested this information but have read both the weight and overtravel screws accessible through the holes in the floorplates of these reproductions (both the Browning and Winchester marked guns) are mechanically inert and ineffective. That is, they adjust nothing.  If anyone knows better, I’d appreciate knowing I’m wrong. 

Although the Browning reproduction is out of manufacture, I’ve read the Winchester version is (or at least was) regularly catalogued.  

I can only report my personal experience but the fit and finish of the Browning/Miroku Winchester model reproductions – which were sold as limited editions – seemed to me to be a bit superior to the same guns manufactured by Miroku and rollmarked Winchester.  When they were first advertised, I had Nix order a new Winchester/Miroku M12, which was very nicely done – styled as a deluxe grade 20 gauge with 26″ ventilated rib, Improved Cylinder barrel. However, when I took it dove hunting on a hot day in West Texas, after the gun warmed up from shooting, the sear interrupter had been fitted too tightly and the gun would lock up after firing. This could have been fixed, of course, but I let it go down the line.  When I later had the chance to buy the Browning-marked equivalent gun, the only difference being the marks and a modified choke, I snatched it up and still have it, as well as a very slick little Browning 42. 

It’s not that I wouldn’t like to own and use a genuine deluxe Winchester M12 20 gauge, the ones I’ve seen with high condition are well above what I’m willing to spend on a pump shotgun, unless it were to be my only shotgun. 

I don’t think these Miroku M12 guns are superior to a post-war deluxe grade M12 made in New Haven, but they are at least equal, if not superior, in workmanship to the several field grade Winchester M12s I’ve owned and re-sold, notably a Heavy Duck and a modified choke 26″ 1950 sixteen gauge.  In fact, after taking both the Browning M12 and the Winchester M12 sixteen gauge dove hunting with my nephew in the brush country, I kept the Browning and sold the Winchester. 

So, I’m not prejudiced against the Miroku reproductions. But I do cherish my genuine 52C Sporting, brazed ramp and all. 

  

Zebulon,

the Miroku C triggers that both the B & C models have, had an extra roll pin added that limits the amount of travel that the pull weight screw could move. You can knock out the roll pin and adjust the trigger by turning the screw in or out.  Some members say that they have gotten the pull weight  down to about a pound and a half. If you go to Rimfire Central and do a search there for the 52R trigger fix, or 52 Winchester lawyer pin, you will find several topics on it.

  

Thank you very much for that useful information. I’ll take your word for it and I’m happy to know Browning  had Miroku install a real, adjustable  Micro Motion trigger in those guns.  The underwriter-dictated, removable, blocking pin is the sort of minor nuisance we can live with and be grateful it wasn’t worse.

- Bill 

 

WACA # 65205; life member, NRA; member, TGCA; member, TSRA; amateur preservationist

"I have seen wicked men and fools, a great many of both, and I believe they both get paid in the end, but the fools first." -- David Balfour, narrator and protagonist of the novel, Kidnapped, by Robert Louis Stevenson.

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