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Wood colors & stains
July 25, 2019
10:28 pm
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Ct
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I have six 1894 rifles & 5 are pre 1900 all original with letters. The wood stain colors vary in each one.

Can anyone explain the darker & lighter colors?  I realize every stock didn’t come from the same tree so I assume the Winchester stain application can appear different from time to time. 

AG

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July 25, 2019
11:18 pm
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First, you are basically correct, the actual stock "tree" differs AND the Winchester employee(s) deploying the stain differ.  However, aside from that, it is a complicated question without further details.  I am am Winchester collector and amateur researcher/historian but NOT on the 94's so I can only offer some of the basics.....

Winchester used a variety of woods (gumwood for the saddle ring carbines, walnut for the '95 rifles" and even cherry in latter years for .22 rifles) so, without the exact model specifics and  pre-1900 serial number data and data cannot be entirely specific, so we can only speak in generalities.  It is akin to asking the the "Chevy" forum, I have a Chevy pickup and the "paint color" varies on some of them......what's up with that?

No disrespect, but to answer very specifically on your question, we need specific details.......

We are CERTAINLY here to help, and willing to answer your question, so if you can give us the vintages of your rifles, the perceived wood species, the color of the finish, serial number (YES THAT DOES HELP US) and photos (the second most important) we can provide you with much more pertinent info.  Hopefully from the gurus that specialize in these things.......

Best regards,

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July 25, 2019
11:55 pm
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Ct
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Thanks JWA for the reply. I wasn’t interested in pursuing this to the extent of serial numbers & photos etc, rather just a generalization inquiry. I’m not trying to avoid detailing my rifle info as I’ve sent most in for surveys through this public forum, just thought there might be a readers digest answer. 

AG

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July 26, 2019
1:17 am
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i understand completely! Do not really need to feel the need to need to define the "era" it was produced or materialization of the rife but if you can give us the 'YEAR" it was produced it would help.  

Regards,

WACA Member #6284 - Specializing in Pre-64 Winchester .22 Rimfire

July 26, 2019
5:39 pm
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Most likely all the stocks are walnut.  Like was said before wood can vary and can absorb the stain differently.  I doubt that the stain itself varied.  The fact that some guns are then oiled or varnished might look differently.  Different levels of exposure and handling can cause some difference too. 

July 26, 2019
6:25 pm
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Ct
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Chuck said
Most likely all the stocks are walnut.  Like was said before wood can vary and can absorb the stain differently.  I doubt that the stain itself varied.  The fact that some guns are then oiled or varnished might look differently.  Different levels of exposure and handling can cause some difference too.   

Thanks Chuck. 

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July 27, 2019
2:18 pm
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Ct
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JWA said
i understand completely! Do not really need to feel the need to need to define the "era" it was produced or materialization of the rife but if you can give us the 'YEAR" it was produced it was helped.  

Again, t.

 

9and simply, 

leave it aksone0

AG said
Thanks JWA for the reply. I wasn’t interested in pursuing this to the extent of serial numbers & photos etc, rather just a generalization inquiry. I’m not trying to avoid detailing my rifle info as I’ve sent most in for surveys through this public forum, just thought there might be a readers digest answer. 

again, you are talking bout  

several of rifles 

9 of hundrfeeds of thouhands thar fall within your collection range, please give us mpe infoo to help you....

1

 

9impp

The   

From left to right 1903, 1899, 1899, 1899, 1898, 1885. 3E3F16C5-0521-4F25-9921-1E15F8B8A9FB.jpegImage Enlarger

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July 27, 2019
4:18 pm
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“When you go out into the woods, and you look at trees, you see all these different trees. And some of them are bent, and some of them are straight, and some of them are evergreens, and some of them are whatever. And you look at the tree and you allow it. You see why it is the way it is. You sort of understand that it didn’t get enough light, and so it turned that way. And you don’t get all emotional about it. You just allow it. You appreciate the tree.

The minute you get near humans, you lose all that. And you are constantly saying ‘You are too this, or I’m too this.’ That judgment mind comes in. And so I practice turning people into trees. Which means appreciating them just the way they are.”

― Ram Dass

I like dark wood on my Winchesters, from years of dirty, oily, working hands.  

July 28, 2019
4:49 pm
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Ct
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Huck Riley said
“When you go out into the woods, and you look at trees, you see all these different trees. And some of them are bent, and some of them are straight, and some of them are evergreens, and some of them are whatever. And you look at the tree and you allow it. You see why it is the way it is. You sort of understand that it didn’t get enough light, and so it turned that way. And you don’t get all emotional about it. You just allow it. You appreciate the tree.

The minute you get near humans, you lose all that. And you are constantly saying ‘You are too this, or I’m too this.’ That judgment mind comes in. And so I practice turning people into trees. Which means appreciating them just the way they are.”

― Ram Dass

I like dark wood on my Winchesters, from years of dirty, oily, working hands.    

That’s an awesome quote from Dass. Thanks for the reply Huck. 

AG

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July 28, 2019
5:48 pm
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AG said

That’s an awesome quote from Dass. Thanks for the reply Huck. 

AG  

You bet!  I try not to judge when people like light wood, NIB, shiny, short guns with round barrels! Smile

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