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Should I restore my 1892? Will it decrease the value if I do??
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Pa.
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October 27, 2019 - 5:33 pm
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I just inherited an 1892, and ran the serial number. Mfg was 1903. 

some where in the guns history someone cut the mag. tube in half. 

was thinking of locating the correct parts and restoring just the parts. No refinishing of patina or stock. 

any thoughts would be appreciated. 

thx 

mark

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October 27, 2019 - 6:29 pm
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Kinda depends, I think, on how nice a job was done on the amputation–if it’s a cob-job, you definitely should do it.  But, assuming you can find the correct parts, you’ll still have the problem of matching the replacement tube to the barrel.  If you can find (or make) a good match, it would be beneficial to do it, but not if the tube looks either too new or too worn to match the rest of the metal.

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October 27, 2019 - 6:38 pm
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I completely agree with Clarence. If you can match the condition with correct period parts, it would be worth it. The only reason I may consider leaving it would be if you had an old photograph of a family member holding the rifle in the current configuration. If not, I would consider resurrecting it.

                                                                               ~Gary~

                                                                                                                                                                              94-SRR.jpg

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October 27, 2019 - 7:43 pm
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[email protected] said
I just inherited an 1892, and ran the serial number. Mfg was 1903. 

some where in the guns history someone cut the mag. tube in half. 

was thinking of locating the correct parts and restoring just the parts. No refinishing of patina or stock. 
any thoughts would be appreciated. 

thx 

mark  

Pictures would really help us help you.  I think Clarence and Gary are on the right track though. 

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October 31, 2019 - 4:39 pm
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[email protected] said
I just inherited an 1892, and ran the serial number. Mfg was 1903. 

some where in the guns history someone cut the mag. tube in half. 

was thinking of locating the correct parts and restoring just the parts. No refinishing of patina or stock. 
any thoughts would be appreciated. 

thx 

mark  

Hello Mark,

I would tend to lean toward getting original replacement parts and putting it back to the correct configuration.  Otherwise you have an unsightly empty dovetail cut into the underside of the barrel  that does not look good.  The finish match is going to be a bit difficult but close is better than nothing.   Can I please get the full serial number and some photos of the areas of stamped writing on the rifle so that I can add it into my survey?   [email protected]

Thanks

Michael

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Model 1892 / Model 61 Collector, Research, Valuation

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November 1, 2019 - 3:42 am
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I have redone 2 model 94’s. A rifle and a carbine. They weren’t worth much the way they were. The Carbine had completely trashed wood and missing the front site. The metal was coated with something like cosmoline but was otherwise in good condition, almost no bluing left. I bought wood from Dixie Gun Works and fitted it to the gun. Finished it with original stain and lacquer. Had a local competent gunsmith blue it with minimal buffing and replaced the front sight and saddle ring. It turned out nice, and I am not afraid to carry it out hunting. 

The other is a rifle in 25-35. It also had trashed wood. Some garage mechanic shortened the 26″ barrel to an odd length and filed a spot for the front sight. Shortened the mag tube also but hacked into the barrel a little. Well I bought it for 100. Wood again from Dixie. Fit and finish just like the carbine. Because of the butchering my only choice was a 20″ barrel and the cool part about that was the dovetail for the mag tube went right where the bonehead had hit the barrel. The metal and bore were in great shape. We blued it and I have packed it out moose hunting. It’s one of my favorites. BTW, I killed a 9 1/2′ Brown Bear with a Deluxe 71 in 348 in 1990. Mid 90’s I whacked a huge black bear with a model 64 in .32 Special. I took a caribou with a .405 1895 that has been in our family since it was new. 

Sometimes refinishing them is o.k. Sometimes not. Depends on condition mostly, and what it’s worth as is, and what it will be worth when your done. The two I did weren’t worth much as is. About what I paid for them. $100 each. I’m certain that they are now worth more than I have in them, and I really like both of them.

Shoot low boys. They're riding Shetland Ponies.

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November 6, 2022 - 1:30 am
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I inherited a Winchester 44, model 1892, 20’ round barrel from my grandfather. I’m in love with her (calling her Susie Q, after Marciano’s right hand punch). Thing is she’s very worn out. You can barely see the 44 W.C.F. in the barrel. 
I’m from Brazil and in the beginning of the 1900’s this was THE CARBINE. So she’s worked a lot, I can tell. Apparently it belonged to an uncle of my grandfather before him. So it must have been manufactured more than a 100 years ago. 
She still shoots, though she gags a bit when reloading.
Do you guys have any tips about what should I do to keep her functionnal? I can’t take her to a restoration guy since the serial number has been scrapped. What can I do to make her function better? Is it safe to shoot with her (I shot 3 times already, she did great but I’m afraid all the explosions in the chamber might disassemble or break sth. Is it possible? What should I do? I love her and don’t want to stop using her nor break her. Cheers, guys!

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November 6, 2022 - 2:26 am
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Francisco Soprano said
I inherited a Winchester 44, model 1892, 20’ round barrel from my grandfather. I’m in love with her (calling her Susie Q, after Marciano’s right hand punch). Thing is she’s very worn out. You can barely see the 44 W.C.F. in the barrel. 

I’m from Brazil and in the beginning of the 1900’s this was THE CARBINE. So she’s worked a lot, I can tell. Apparently it belonged to an uncle of my grandfather before him. So it must have been manufactured more than a 100 years ago. 

She still shoots, though she gags a bit when reloading.

Do you guys have any tips about what should I do to keep her functionnal? I can’t take her to a restoration guy since the serial number has been scrapped. What can I do to make her function better? Is it safe to shoot with her (I shot 3 times already, she did great but I’m afraid all the explosions in the chamber might disassemble or break sth. Is it possible? What should I do? I love her and don’t want to stop using her nor break her. Cheers, guys!

  

The serial number can be brought back with the right acid. A good restoration guy will normally do that.

Bob

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November 6, 2022 - 2:57 am
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Francisco Soprano said I’m afraid all the explosions in the chamber might disassemble or break sth. Is it possible?
  

No, that’s not likely, but if cartridges won’t feed reliably, identifying the cause of that problem will probably require a good gunsmith, & they’re hard to find in this country, too.  You really have nothing to loose by shooting it until something stops working altogether. 

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November 6, 2022 - 5:23 pm
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What is not functioning well?  Under normal circumstances I would say to oil the gun and shoot standard velocity loads and you’d be fine.  Any restoration might just be a waste of money?  There is a chance, with some pictures, one of the experts could narrow down the period of manufacture.

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November 6, 2022 - 5:57 pm
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Chuck said
What is not functioning well?  Under normal circumstances I would say to oil the gun and shoot standard velocity loads and you’d be fine.  Any restoration might just be a waste of money?

  

A “restoration” would be a TOTAL waste, but if there’s nothing worse than a feeding problem, that would be worth fixing.

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