Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —






— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters




sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_Print sp_TopicIcon
Pre-64 Winchester Rifle Final Finish
October 18, 2019
5:46 pm
Avatar
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 34
Member Since:
September 14, 2016
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I have noticed that the finish on my Winchester Lever Actions vary by the condition of the gun. The rifles that I have in the 90% condition have a shiny look to the wood stock & forend. However the rifles in the 40% condition have a dull finish. I am refinishing an 1890 Winchester and would like to get the shiny look. After staining the stock I applied Boiled Linseed Oil, but the wood still doesn't shine. I don't think Winchester applied a shellac or polyurethane to their stocks, but how did they get the shine?

Thanks, Dick 

October 18, 2019
8:27 pm
Avatar
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 1112
Member Since:
November 1, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Richard Pike said
I don't think Winchester applied a shellac or polyurethane to their stocks, but how did they get the shine?
   

Neither of those (don't think polyurethane existed before the '50s), but most makers seemed to prefer ambiguity in discussing stock finishes.  I've read that spar varnish was used, but considering the curing time required for varnish, I wonder if it was not really quick-drying lacquer, at least on standard grade guns with plain wood. 

Can't find any specific description of finish in earlier catalogs, but the 1925 catalog refers to a choice of oil or "polished finish"; the latter I'd take to be varnish, because the oil finish "can be supplied with less delay."  And like different bluing methods employed, finishes surely changed over the years.

If you really saturate wood with linseed oil, other finishes applied over it may not adhere well. 

October 19, 2019
1:42 pm
Avatar
NE OREGON
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 515
Member Since:
July 8, 2016
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Dick, I'm not sure I would want any old Winchester wood to "shine". Have a sheen, satin look yes, but not a shine. 

October 19, 2019
2:45 pm
Avatar
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 846
Member Since:
May 24, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

According to Ned Schwing, between 1890 and the beginning of WW1, a natural shellac finish was used, and after that until the end of production a nitrocellulose lacquer compound with a wax base was used.  Checking the stocks on two of my 1890s from some old pictures, one dating to 1916 and the other to 1919, supports Schwing's statements.

James

October 19, 2019
4:18 pm
Avatar
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 995
Member Since:
March 31, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Richard, Winchester either varnished or oiled the stocks.  Boiled linseed oil was used but I don't know exactly what type or the process that was used for the varnish?  Fancy guns will have an O or a V stamped on the lower tang. 

Apply coats of boiled linseed oil until the wood has soaked in as much as it can.  You can then hand polish the finish with most any furniture polish.  If this doesn't work for you put a small amount of Truoil in some linseed oil for the last coat.  Stay away from waxes that dry white or you have to clean out all the cracks and pits.

October 19, 2019
6:23 pm
Avatar
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 34
Member Since:
September 14, 2016
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Eagle said
Dick, I'm not sure I would want any old Winchester wood to "shine". Have a sheen, satin look yes, but not a shine.   

I guess I meant "sheen", just not the dull look that my Winchester 1892 stock has. Thank you for your reply.

October 19, 2019
6:25 pm
Avatar
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 34
Member Since:
September 14, 2016
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Chuck said
Richard, Winchester either varnished or oiled the stocks.  Boiled linseed oil was used but I don't know exactly what type or the process that was used for the varnish?  Fancy guns will have an O or a V stamped on the lower tang. 

Apply coats of boiled linseed oil until the wood has soaked in as much as it can.  You can then hand polish the finish with most any furniture polish.  If this doesn't work for you put a small amount of Truoil in some linseed oil for the last coat.  Stay away from waxes that dry white or you have to clean out all the cracks and pits.  

Chuck, thank you for your reply, I will give this a try.

October 19, 2019
6:26 pm
Avatar
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 34
Member Since:
September 14, 2016
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

jwm94 said
According to Ned Schwing, between 1890 and the beginning of WW1, a natural shellac finish was used, and after that until the end of production a nitrocellulose lacquer compound with a wax base was used.  Checking the stocks on two of my 1890s from some old pictures, one dating to 1916 and the other to 1919, supports Schwing's statements.

James  

James, thank you for your reply. I will see if I can fine the nitrocellulose lacquer.

October 21, 2019
9:12 pm
Avatar
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 995
Member Since:
March 31, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Richard Pike said

James, thank you for your reply. I will see if I can fine the nitrocellulose lacquer.  

Shellac can be purchased at any good woodworking store.  Lacquer is sold at paint stores. 

Forum Timezone: UTC 0

Most Users Ever Online: 628

Currently Online: admin@bulkcheapammo.com
22 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)


Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 16

Topics: 6609

Posts: 53203


Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 887

Members: 8727

Moderators: 4

Admins: 3


Top Posters:

1873man: 3982

twobit: 2466

TXGunNut: 2154

Maverick: 1455

Big Larry: 1373

JWA: 1237

Wincacher: 1180

clarence: 1112

Brad Dunbar: 1068

Chuck: 995

Navigation