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Identifying & Cleaning a 1928 Win 1894
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October 18, 2022 - 3:50 pm
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Hiya Folks,

This rifle was just recently handed down to me from my uncle. Currently my son and I are the last shooters in the family. From what I can determine, it’s a 192WIN94_1928_01-1.jpgImage EnlargerWIN94_1928_08.jpgImage EnlargerWIN94_1928_10.jpgImage EnlargerWIN94_1928_04.jpgImage EnlargerWIN94_1928_09.jpgImage EnlargerWIN94_1928_02.jpgImage Enlarger8 model 1894, although I’m not quite sure which specific version. I’ve searched YouTube for disassembly instructions and haven’t yet found a rifle that quite matches this one. It’s the oldest firearm we now own but on assurances from my uncle we’ve already had it to the range and boy is it still spot-on accurate.

So as I look to set this firearm up for success over the next 25-30 years, I’m finding I’m coming up with a couple of questions. First is can anyone help me identify which version of model 1894 this is?

Secondly, I went to disassemble the rifle and got stumped only just 6-7 steps in on one of the screws going into the stock. Not sure if it comes across in the pics but the smaller screw on the top is so worn down it barely has enough of a wall for a screwdriver to catch on to. Any thoughts on how to get this screw loose without damaging it so I can further disassemble the rifle and see what might need to be cleaned up inside?

Thanks y’all!
Pete

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October 18, 2022 - 4:02 pm
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You have an Eastern Carbine as I don’t see where a saddle ring stud hole, and associated wear to the frame, exists.

What caliber is your carbine?

I recommend you enjoy shooting it.  It’s a nice gift, but, unfortunately, the wood has been sanded and refinished, there are deep gouges in the forearm, the front sight is an improper replacement, and the receiver has been drilled for a receiver sight which definitely decreases overall desirability.

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October 18, 2022 - 4:11 pm
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mrcvs said
What caliber is your carbine?  

It’s a 25-35, which were tricky rounds to track down but we stumbled into a couple of boxes of Hornady soft tips. What you point out is really fascinating as I’m not as familiar with this rifle. Lots of terms I want to start reading up on. Thanks for the input!

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October 18, 2022 - 4:44 pm
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Peter Kotsonis said

Secondly, I went to disassemble the rifle and got stumped only just 6-7 steps in on one of the screws going into the stock. Not sure if it comes across in the pics but the smaller screw on the top is so worn down it barely has enough of a wall for a screwdriver to catch on to. Any thoughts on how to get this screw loose without damaging it so I can further disassemble the rifle and see what might need to be cleaned up inside?

Thanks y’all!

Pete

  

Hi Pete, 

No offense, but why do you feel the urge to disassemble the rifle?  Unless you have the proper know-how and the proper tools (gunsmithing scewdrivers in particular), you are risking further damage to the rifle.  I’ve seen way to many Winchesters with ugly buggered screws due to K-Mart-quality screwdrivers.  Why not just clean the bore and the action and give it a good wipe down and call it good?  The screw you are referring to is just a filler screw for a tang sight and does you no good to remove, unless you are wanting to equip the rifle with a tang mounted peep sight.

Don

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October 18, 2022 - 6:07 pm
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Pete,

I am in complete agreement with the responses you have received thus far.  There is no good reason to disassemble your Eastern Carbine, especially if it functions properly and shoots accurately.

If you want to know the exact date of manufacture, I can provide that if you provide the complete serial number.

Bert

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October 18, 2022 - 6:45 pm
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Oh that’s really interesting – I just assumed being an older rifle if my goal is to keep it shooting longer, I should make sure there’s nothing on the interior that might lessen that longevity. So I had that incorrect?

The primary reason I was looking into this, myself, was a lack of gunsmith resources in our area. I recently made the same assumption on the ’94’s interior for another firearm my uncle handed down a bit earlier – an old Winchester Model 12 16ga shotgun. I went to have a local gunsmith look at it but quickly learned that gunsmith resources in our area are pretty limited.

The local shops primarily cater to smithing AR-15s and the like with young bucks doing the service that aren’t familiar with these older guns. The local shops said they were willing to clean out the visible surfaces but weren’t sure how to get beyond that with such an old gun. I was later advised by my gun club to reach out to a firearms auction house in the region and got this response: “Unfortunately the gunsmith you seek is probably something of yesteryear. Most of the folks that call themselves gunsmiths these days are nothing more than parts changers… I’m afraid it is part of the changing demographic. The younger crowd no longer cares about anything antique, much less history… sadly the men who care about these arms are gone or leaving us on a daily basis…”

Serial number is 1063932.

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October 18, 2022 - 7:56 pm
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Pete,

Let me give you an analogy to consider… if you bought a used vehicle, would you tear down the engine if it was running perfectly fine?

S/N 1063932 was actually manufactured on March 28th, 1930.

Bert

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October 18, 2022 - 8:29 pm
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Bert H. said
Pete,

Let me give you an analogy to consider… if you bought a used vehicle, would you tear down the engine if it was running perfectly fine?

S/N 1063932 was actually manufactured on March 28th, 1930.

Bert

  

Thanks for the serial info, Bert! I’m new to firearms and the club I joined here in the area recommended that if I’m shooting, I should clean it by disassembling it at least into its larger components within a few days of hitting the range and then less often so, disassembling it completely. Just trying to keep my nose clean, so was following the local recommendations – you’re saying just keep shooting?

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October 18, 2022 - 9:20 pm
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Pete,

You are welcome.

It is highly advisable to inspect and clean the bore before and after each time you take it out shooting.  It is not necessary to disassemble the gun to do that.  If you see signs of dirt, crud, or any other foreign material building up in the action, then a more detailed cleaning would be in order.  Simply keep the gun clean and very lightly oiled.

Bert

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October 23, 2022 - 4:09 am
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Peter-

if your 94 cycles smoothly and there are no visible issues with the receiver or barrel you are probably ready for a range trip. If you have any doubts please consult a qualified gunsmith. Someone who can screw together a black gun is NOT a gunsmith, quite likely not even a good choice as an armorer. If your 94 is a bit balky removing the wood (please use the correct screwdrivers!) and hosing it down with a good aerosol cleaner (Gun Scrubber) followed by a few drops of Break Free and a few dozen cycles of the lever should improve things. If not, it may be time for professional attention. Personally, I don’t disassemble an 1894 except to replace broken parts. 

Mike

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