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1892 Loading Issue
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Virginia Beach
Posts: 52
December 3, 2022 - 10:54 am

1sp_QuotePost

This is an ongoing saga.

The gun is a resurrection basket case. I have it together and it does work and shoot except for loading. The last bullet loaded does not seat properly on the carrier. Advice from the board felt that it was the loading gate. After moths of searching I found another gate and the problem still persists.

Also of note, that when the bullet is turned manually to fit onto the carrier properly, then the loading gate cannot open to allow more bullets to be loaded. With the bullet still askew on the carrier, more rounds can be loaded, but the last bullet loaded is always cocked at an angle preventing the carrier from operating.

 

Is it possible that the carrier is at fault?

Corey

Winchester 1892 (1898)

Winchester 1894 (1956)

Winchester 1897 (1909)

Winchester 1911 (1911)

Browning A5 Sweet Sixteen (1959)

Browning Superposed (1962)

Browning Hi Power (1949 - 1954)

Browning 1910 (1910)

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Posts: 56
December 4, 2022 - 10:30 pm

2sp_QuotePost

Hi Corey         I think the problem with your 1892 is that the right hand cartridge guide is an incorrect part. This is probably why the carrier screw sticks out.     The feed slots in both left and right guides should be parallel.  You need a correct 1892 R.H. Cartridge Guide, at least.[You will need the large calibre Guide.] Winchester 1892s are very well designed and don’t give much trouble if clean, and springs all OK.      Hope this Helps,  Eric

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South Texas
Posts: 1040
December 7, 2022 - 1:58 am

3sp_QuotePost

Corey, good that you got the right loading gate (im assuming) as per prior posts regarding this rifle.  However it appears the problem still persists.  When the second to the last cartridge is chambered, the carrier falls and the last cartridge is pushed onto the carrier by the magazine tube spring/follower.  Not sure why the cartridge is kicking to the right.  It should get pushed against the stop at the base of the carrier and should align straight on the carrier.  How fast are you cycling the rounds? 

You may also check the magazine tube spring.  If its weak it will not push the cartridge with enough force to the back of the carrier stop. 

Here are some pics showing the cartridge guides and carrier on a large caliber 92.  Its hard to tell from your pics what you have because they are not quite at the right angle and are blurry. 

 

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1892takedown @sbcglobal.net ......NRA Endowment Life Member.....WACA Member

"God is great.....beer is good.....and people are crazy"... Billy Currington

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Virginia Beach
Posts: 52
February 27, 2023 - 9:31 pm

4sp_QuotePost

I am still struggling with this last round loaded issue. It will not seat onto the carrier, inline with the magazine.

I have concluded that it cannot be the loading gate. If the round seats properly, it never touches the loading gate because it’s resting against the lever. Even with it partially loaded (not a full magazine), you can still load more at any time so long as the lever is in the closed position.

The rounds will feed, shoot, and cycle once that last round has been properly positioned onto the carrier (by non-traditional means)

I thought it might be the magazine spring, but the same thing happens even if I have my 4 dummy rounds loaded (i.e. more spring tension on the last round loaded.) My dummy rounds are made to 1.56 in which is in the middle of the SAAMI specs.

The right cartridge guide doesn’t touch the round until it’s being lifted by the carrier for loading.

 

What makes the bullet seat onto the carrier? Is it just force from your finger?

Corey

Winchester 1892 (1898)

Winchester 1894 (1956)

Winchester 1897 (1909)

Winchester 1911 (1911)

Browning A5 Sweet Sixteen (1959)

Browning Superposed (1962)

Browning Hi Power (1949 - 1954)

Browning 1910 (1910)

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Posts: 37
March 1, 2023 - 6:22 am

5sp_QuotePost

Corey,  I looked your pictures, they were really blurry and hard to make out the parts.  
What caliber is the 92 chambered in?  
what cartridge guides are in the receiver?

What carrier is in the receiver? 

so if the Winchester is in an original caliber there are large caliber parts and small caliber parts.  So for an example if you have a small caliber rifle and a large caliber carrier it won’t center in the carrier.  If you have the wrong cartridge guides, it won’t want to stay centered and won’t feed correctly.  
look at the pictures Mr 1892 Takedown posted, those are large caliber parts and are correct if you have a large caliber Winchester yours should match his. 
Mr. 1892 Takedown also made a good point about the mag spring,  if the spring is worn it gets weaker towards the end.  When I am cleaning a rifle (as in detail stripping down to a barreled action) always make sure the spring is still the correct length which transfers to tension.  To check the spring (on a 73, 92, or 94)  length/tension remove the magazine plug with the follower and spring installed all the way down the tube, The spring should stick out 6” for magazines 20” and over…. the spring should stick out 4” for 20” and under magazines.   For button or 1/2 magazines and trapper magazines I do make the springs just a bit shorter at 3-1/2”.  

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South Texas
Posts: 1040
March 1, 2023 - 8:25 am

6sp_QuotePost

As discussed above, good clear photos of the cartridge guides on each side affixed in the receiver, the carrier (would be nice if it was removed from the receiver so we could see the top and both sides) , the magazine tube follower, loading gate (both sides out of the gun, and exterior photo of receiver showing loading gate) and verify the magazine tube spring length (and diameter) as Sam mentioned. 

At this point it is a guessing game without clear photos, but it has to be an issue with one of these parts.  If its feeding all but the last round then you would anticipate no issues with the cartridge guides, carrier, or loading gate, leaving the magazine tube spring and follower as the potential issue based on what youve described is happening.  Also verify that you have a full length magazine tube, Ive seen at least one gun a long time ago that had an original tube that was visible from the outside but was was cut, the cut portion being 6″ of that covered by the forearm wood – some shystery happened on that one. 

Chris 

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1892takedown @sbcglobal.net ......NRA Endowment Life Member.....WACA Member

"God is great.....beer is good.....and people are crazy"... Billy Currington

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Virginia Beach
Posts: 52
April 23, 2023 - 10:25 am

7sp_QuotePost

It is a loading issue, not feeding.

Once I get the last round in and get it in front of the lever where it belongs, everything else works fine. It doesn’t matter if I only load 1 round or 10 rounds, the last round going in is difficult to set in front of the lever. Therefore I don’t think it’s a mag spring issue either. When multiple rounds are loaded, the rounds stack up into the magazine as they should. Maybe my fingers are too fat?

 

I’ve checked the guides and lever with a response from and earlier and they all match with the large caliber. The gun barrel I’m using is a 44-40.

Corey

Winchester 1892 (1898)

Winchester 1894 (1956)

Winchester 1897 (1909)

Winchester 1911 (1911)

Browning A5 Sweet Sixteen (1959)

Browning Superposed (1962)

Browning Hi Power (1949 - 1954)

Browning 1910 (1910)

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Posts: 37
August 18, 2023 - 6:03 am

8sp_QuotePost

I recently had a man ship me a 1892 the cartridges came out of the magazine cocked off to the side would not line up in the carrier etc.  I tested it several ways and could not figure it out  from just cycling dummy cartridges through it.   The man had already turned the 1892 (manufactured in 1901) in for repair to no less than 5 gunsmiths.  I couldn’t disappoint the gentleman after all he shipped it from Texas to Idaho to get it fixed.  Winchesters are not that difficult of a mechanical item.  The devil is usually in the details.    So the next step was to tear it down. I took the 1892 apart to see what the feeding issue could possibly be.  After stripping it down I did NOT see an obvious problem with parts etc.  So lastly I took the cartridge guides out.  That is when I discovered the issue.  The left cartridge guide has a spring behind it putting tension on the cartridge stop.  the spring had either slipped out while being installed or just installed wrong.  It had been installed between the cartridge guide and the receiver and putting tension on the cartridge stop in the wrong direction.  (I should have caught that from observing, as it is something I usually check and didn’t this time because I was so focused on the weirdness of the issue). I installed the cartridge stop spring in correctly, then reassembled the rifle and presto. It worked perfectly!  That issue made me wonder if you do not have a similar issue.  Once again, Chris said it best, we are only guessing since we are not seeing the rifle or clear pictures.  But it did make me wonder…… 

Sam 

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