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1892 issue
May 6, 2014
3:10 pm
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I have a model 1892 from 1917 with an issue. When you work the lever back to cock the hammer it doesn't catch, and goes back to half cock when you bring the bolt forward. Has anyone else had this and what might I do to fix this?

May 6, 2014
10:26 pm
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Ontario Canada
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April 23, 2012
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If the hammer will catch and stay when you pull the hammer back with your thumb , then you have too much wear between the camming faces of the bolt and hammer. I have got the bolt built up with toolweld and reground that bolt area so it will force the hammer back enough to catch again, Some may have a better solution , I am also curious. After experiencing this wear, I now out of habit pull the hammer back by thumb prior to working the lever, whenever possible,( like shooting single shot at the range, or working the lever at home for cleaning or whatever) to save a bit of future wear. If the surfaces always had a proper grease coating where camming, I think it would take a lot more lever throws to create this wear

Phils-Schuetzen-compressed.jpg 

May 7, 2014
5:01 am
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There are a couple of possible causes for this, and solutions for each.
As 25-20 brought up it could be wear on the bolt/hammer interface, the bolt not pushing the hammer back far enough.
It could also be a broken/worn hammer /sear notch, or worn frame/bolt guide rails allowing the bolt to ride up too much.
Another possibility is a lot of play in the lower tang, which changes the geometry between the sear and hammer.
Or it could be all of the above.

May 7, 2014
2:49 pm
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The hammer stays back when I use my thumb to cock it and the action seems tight. I only need to pull the hammer back slightly to cock it after working the lever, so I"ll have to take it apart to look at the sear notch and the guide rails. Anything tough about taking these apart?

May 8, 2014
5:33 am
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Ontario Canada
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The working function when manually using thumb eliminates hammer/sear issues.

Phils-Schuetzen-compressed.jpg 

May 8, 2014
4:49 pm
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Where could I find "tool-weld"?

May 8, 2014
5:07 pm
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He's probably trying to say it was welded with a wear hardening welding rod. They make all kinds of welding rods for all kinds of applications. Wear hardening rod is similar to the type that is used on, let's say bulldozer blades, road grader blades or a number of uses that the item is subjected to a lot of wear. Hope this helps. RRM

May 9, 2014
2:39 am
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The toolweld is done by someone who does mig/tig welding,like Mac says with a tough wear resistant rod , then you would need a gunsmith or machinist to regrind the profile, and keep checking the fit with the gun till the bolt will ride over the hammer again and do its job .Easy for a shooter-Machinest/Toolmaker, if you know any. This method has worked well for me on a couple , but Mike may have an easier fix .

Phils-Schuetzen-compressed.jpg 

May 9, 2014
5:48 am
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Ok I am familiar with hard surfacing. I really appreciate your help with this and I'll let you know how it turns out.

Jeff

May 9, 2014
7:05 am
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Another alternative that could work is replacing the hammer with a new one without wear, or the old hammer could be welded up and reground instead of the bolt, but weld would be more noticable, and probably a little harder to regrind exactly right. Also depends on your outlook on originality. I also had a shadowgraph at work where I could compare profiles. The shop was well equipped. I miss the convenience of being able to fix my guns there

Phils-Schuetzen-compressed.jpg 

May 9, 2014
1:45 pm
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Unfortunately I passed up a bolt and hammer on an e-bay bid for around $100. I'm sure there are more around. I do like my firearms to be original but not at the expense of not functioning. I bought this little rifle to shoot and that is the goal. I dropped it off by a friend who is a tool and die maker so I'm fairly confident he can make it right.

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