Avatar
Please consider registering
Guest
Search
Forum Scope




Match



Forum Options



Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters
Register Lost password?
Avatar
Illinois
Member
WACA Guest
Forum Posts: 13
Member Since:
December 16, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
July 10, 2022 - 3:46 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

I’ve acquired my first 1873, one which was redone by Turnbull about 15 years ago. The hammer is heavy (as in rolling block heavy), and so the opening force is high. Is this typical? (The tensioning screw is backed off.)

I see both Winchester Bob and Numrich have mainsprings. I wonder if I could acquire one and grind it down to lighten the lever force. However, it is a very big firing pin, so perhaps the heavy hammer is necessary?

Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 4517
Member Since:
March 31, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
July 11, 2022 - 9:07 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

If you buy a new spring I would test it out before you do any grinding.  I really doubt grinding would solve your problem anyway.

Avatar
Illinois
Member
WACA Guest
Forum Posts: 13
Member Since:
December 16, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
July 12, 2022 - 1:22 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

I can’t see it being anything other than the mainspring. Even before cleaning the action, it cycled easily if the hammer was already back. Or are you suggesting the heavy hammer is necessary for reliable ignition in these?

Avatar
Wisconsin
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 4259
Member Since:
May 2, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
July 12, 2022 - 1:47 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

Too bad you don’t have another to compare it to by pulling it back by hand. Do you have other Winchester models?

Bob

WACA Life Member---
NRA Life Member----
Cody Firearms member since 1991
Researching the Winchester 1873's

73_86cutaway.jpg

Email: [email protected]

Avatar
Illinois
Member
WACA Guest
Forum Posts: 13
Member Since:
December 16, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
5
July 12, 2022 - 1:35 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory sp_QuotePost

No, this is the first repeater I’ve owned in many years. There is, though, a shop 50 miles from here that carries many old Winchesters. While a trip there might be in order, in looking around the web further, I’ve seen a few comments that these old Winchesters were badly over sprung, just as the Uberti copies are. Sheepishly, I must admit one of the reasons I picked up a ’73 was the delight in firing an Uberti CAS rifle a couple of years ago, easily the smoothest repeater I’ve ever tried. I assumed the hand fitting more common in the 1800s would have resulted in an equally smooth rifle. Also, the Miroku copies aren’t like this original, either. I’ll play around with the spring and see what I can do.

Avatar
Wisconsin
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 4259
Member Since:
May 2, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
6
July 12, 2022 - 1:58 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

The guns were made using jigs and fixtures so parts are interchangeable and they are smooth and easy to cycle when well cared for. My guess is the restore process is like it being remanufactured and you don’t know whose parts were put in it or how badly it was worn out before they started. First step is to open it up and check out the inside for wear and lubrication.

bob

WACA Life Member---
NRA Life Member----
Cody Firearms member since 1991
Researching the Winchester 1873's

73_86cutaway.jpg

Email: [email protected]

Avatar
Member
WACA Member
Forum Posts: 29
Member Since:
December 23, 2018
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
7
July 12, 2022 - 2:04 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

Where are you located? I have several 73’s you could compare. I’m in n central Illinois.

Avatar
Illinois
Member
WACA Guest
Forum Posts: 13
Member Since:
December 16, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
8
July 13, 2022 - 2:59 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

My son and I tore down my ’73 this past weekend. A spot of rust near the front sight warranted a look all around, with application of preservative lubricants. There is some pitting inside, suggesting Turnbull had a lot of work to do on the outside. Turnbull’s work outside is very well done and looks great these 15 years later. The firing pin was a bit draggy, but a cleaning and new lube fixed that.

My choice of words was poor. While I knew the ’73 was mass produced on jigs and other such tooling, I had figured the parts would be hand finished and polished at assembly. It does appear most of the internal parts are original, based on the wear seen. One of the links is quite broken, and having seen more than one good word about Lee Shaver’s, I have a set on order from him.

shooter4by4, thank you. I’m in Peoria. Simpson is only 45 minutes away. A couple of years ago, I tried a very worn ’73 there. It, too, was very stiff, but given the condition of the rifle I didn’t think much about it. Perhaps it was a harbinger? Regardless, I’ll have to deal with this stiff spring on mine. I don’t know if this is the action’s original spring, but I won’t be working it down any. I’ll save that for a replacement part. It’ll be a few weeks before I have anything to report.

Karl

Avatar
Texas
Member
WACA Guest
Forum Posts: 134
Member Since:
June 9, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
9
July 13, 2022 - 3:24 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_QuotePost

KWK said
My son and I tore down my ’73 this past weekend. A spot of rust near the front sight warranted a look all around, with application of preservative lubricants. There is some pitting inside, suggesting Turnbull had a lot of work to do on the outside. Turnbull’s work outside is very well done and looks great these 15 years later. The firing pin was a bit draggy, but a cleaning and new lube fixed that.

My choice of words was poor. While I knew the ’73 was mass produced on jigs and other such tooling, I had figured the parts would be hand finished and polished at assembly. It does appear most of the internal parts are original, based on the wear seen. One of the links is quite broken, and having seen more than one good word about Lee Shaver’s, I have a set on order from him.

shooter4by4, thank you. I’m in Peoria. Simpson is only 45 minutes away. A couple of years ago, I tried a very worn ’73 there. It, too, was very stiff, but given the condition of the rifle I didn’t think much about it. Perhaps it was a harbinger? Regardless, I’ll have to deal with this stiff spring on mine. I don’t know if this is the action’s original spring, but I won’t be working it down any. I’ll save that for a replacement part. It’ll be a few weeks before I have anything to report.

Karl

  

Yrs. ago I purchased a set of Toggle Links from Lee Shaver for an 1873 Model Circa 1885 . The links are butter smooth and the Headspace was spot on . Very  well made quality workmanship . Good luck with your repair .  ,,,,,DT 

Forum Timezone: UTC 0
Most Users Ever Online: 778
Currently Online: Tedk, Henry Mero, Jeremy P
Guest(s) 124
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)
Top Posters:
clarence: 6150
TXGunNut: 4864
Chuck: 4517
1873man: 4259
steve004: 4097
Big Larry: 2290
twobit: 2283
TR: 1690
mrcvs: 1656
Forum Stats:
Groups: 1
Forums: 17
Topics: 12499
Posts: 108511

 

Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 1727
Members: 8717
Moderators: 4
Admins: 3
Navigation