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Hunting role of the 1886 model
November 6, 2020
4:13 pm
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Hi erveryone, I just realized this might be the more appropriate section for my question, so I will post it again here and hope, you can help me?

I am a big fan of the 1886… One of the finest rifles ever made imho. Yet I wonder how long its actual hey days lastet back in the late 19th century?

When the first smokeless rifles appeared- is it correct to say that even with the 1895 model on the market the 1886 in its .45 and .50 calibers still was #1 choice for the biggest and dangerous American game (until the .405 WCF appeared in 1904) ?

30 WCF, 30 Army, 303 British were all no real big game cartridges, right?

Would be great to hear your opinions on this matter… 

Thanks a lot, folks! 

November 6, 2020
7:58 pm
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I’m a fan of both the 86 & 95. But if it was me in 1902 and choosing, I’m still going with the 86 in 33 cal. I still like my 95 in 35WCF & to be more definitive regarding your post, I would prob still take a 45-90 over the 405.

RickC

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November 6, 2020
9:30 pm
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I think that’s why the 1894 got so popular, they were big enough for big game and small enough for small game. They were handsome,  lighter, easy to handle, dependable and lesser expensive to buy and shoot. One gun ,(30-30), would cover all the bases. The same holds true even in today,s environment. Now if all I was hunting was moose b, big bear etc. then the ’86 is the common sense answer, or for smaller game, rabbit fox coyote, etc.a small bore ’92 would do the trick. Just My thoughts.

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November 6, 2020
9:55 pm
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Henry Mero said
I think that’s why the 1894 got so popular, they were big enough for big game and small enough for small game. They were handsome,  lighter, easy to handle, dependable and lesser expensive to buy and shoot. One gun ,(30-30), would cover all the bases. The same holds true even in today,s environment. Now if all I was hunting was moose b, big bear etc. then the ’86 is the common sense answer, or for smaller game, rabbit fox coyote, etc.a small bore ’92 would do the trick. Just My thoughts.  

Makes sense to me, Henry.

James

November 7, 2020
7:37 pm
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IMHO the 1886 is one of the most beautiful and well-made rifles ever made. As far as hunting goes I’m thinking the average hunter began to drift towards center fire bolt guns in the mid 1920’s and by 1945 or so the 1886 became “that old lever gun” to a sizable percentage of the hunting public. Most of those bolt guns were chambered for smaller and faster cartridges but then as now many hunters stuck with their lever guns and the 1886 was arguably one of the best. I think the 1895 played a role in the transition. 

 

Mike

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November 7, 2020
9:38 pm
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TXGunNut said
IMHO the 1886 is one of the most beautiful and well-made rifles ever made. As far as hunting goes I’m thinking the average hunter began to drift towards center fire bolt guns in the mid 1920’s and by 1945 or so the 1886 became “that old lever gun” to a sizable percentage of the hunting public. Most of those bolt guns were chambered for smaller and faster cartridges but then as now many hunters stuck with their lever guns and the 1886 was arguably one of the best. I think the 1895 played a role in the transition. 

 

Mike  

When I started hunting in the PNW way back in my youth with Dad, uncles, brothers, and cousins, there weren’t many bolt actions in our group. Mostly Winchester lever guns, and most of those were 94’s, but we had a couple 71’s and the .405 and an .06 in a 95. Savage had a good showing with us too from the .22 Hi Power and .23-35 up the the .300

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November 11, 2020
7:53 am
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Hey guys, thanks a lot for your answers – much aooreciated!! 😍

And lots of interesting facts for a German guy who grew up with only bolt actions and multibarreled firearms accepted by the Traditional hunters here…. Starting to change, though… Leverguns become seen more often… 

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