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Your collection center piece ?
September 29, 2019
6:49 pm
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Ct
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I would enjoy hearing from all WACA members across the globe what they consider the Center piece of their “Winchester” collection. It may be value, rarity, a commemorative, or something sentimental with minimal value, but pick one & feel free to say why.

I look forward to reading the replies.

AG

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September 29, 2019
7:45 pm
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That's a tough one.  They all have different characters that I like.

Sentimental:  I represented a man in Idaho against the USFS, pro-bono.  He found out I liked 86's; said he had one laying around that he'd give me.  I didn't argue.  Turns out it was a full nickel 66 SRC, 4th gen (not an 86).  A childhood friend had given it to him.  The childhood friend's dad had bought it NIB for him when he was a kid living somewhere around SLC.  So, two owners before me.  It was made in 83 but sat in the warehouse until 98.  Must have sat in the hardware store for another 30 years before the kids got a hold of it.  Nice bore, good nickel on frame, rest is kid-rough.

Looks.  I have a dark 86 that was made in 92, left the plant as a 38-56 but someone changed the barrel to 40-82.  Since it had lost collector value, I had it bored out to 45-70 and put a tang site on it.  It has sling swivels on it.  I've killed a lot of deer with it.  It's pretty damn dark, wood and metal.  It's my user.

I have others I like for different reasons: a grey 86 in 45-90 that's 2" over; an 86 with a story (lie?) behind it.  It's all original though, and dark.

September 29, 2019
7:49 pm
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Ct
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Thanks for sharing Huck. Great read.

AG

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October 1, 2019
12:44 am
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I guess historically , My favorite is the '94 carb. that is Canadian proofed and was involved in the surrender and sinking of a German U-boat during the first world war. It is in typical used but good cond. And of course the extra heavy barrel, case colored '94, being 1 of a kind is probably the highlite of My collection, but that is a tough question and a hard one to put a tag on. If I was forced to keep only 1 gun, heaven forbid, out of My collection it would probably be My'94, 14" trapper, I love those little guns.

W.A.C.A. life member, Marlin Collectors Assn. charter and life member, C,S.S.A. member and general gun nut.

October 1, 2019
12:49 am
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Ct
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Good choice Henry & great read.

AG

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Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd

October 1, 2019
11:14 pm
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 I guess my centre piece rifles would be my two almost mint Winchester 64 Deer Rifles.

October 1, 2019
11:16 pm
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Ct
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Very nice. Thanks for sharing 28 Gauge.

AG

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Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd

October 2, 2019
2:51 am
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Ct
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Although I enjoy my shooters the most, the center piece has to be my 86 extra heavy 28”.
I have a mint octagon half mag 94 takedown that was, but the extra heavy acquisition now takes best in show(or shall I say best in vault).

AG

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October 2, 2019
2:26 pm
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In the fall of 1963 as a newly minted Clerk -in -Training with the Hudson's Bay Company at the remote "Inland Post" of Fort Albany on the coast of James Bay I heard about a .35-55 rifle owned by the mostly French speaking Oblate Mission which operated a residential school for Indiginous children and a hospital. I went over to the mission one evening and in my best try at using my high school French I asked to see the rifle. One of the lay brothers went to fetch the 1894 First Model 26" octagon barrelled rifle. It was and still is in pretty bad shape having been used for moose and caribou hunting for before anyone could remember,in the boreal forest of that region.I soon acquired the rifle eventually along with 5 other old guns from the mission including a 1894 Carbine, an 1892 Carbine, a 1890 pump and an 1895 rifle. I have now owned this old 1894 rifle for the past 57 years and while I have some beautiful Winchesters in my modest collection my first Winchester 38-55 remains my favourite.

October 2, 2019
2:33 pm
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Ct
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Great read Dave. Thanks for sharing.

AG

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Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd

October 11, 2019
3:08 am
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Today my answer could be the nice 1885 I recently purchased because it’s JMB’s first successful model and the beginning of his long alliance with Winchester. It’s also a rifle I’ve been pursuing for a few years. Or it could be a rather nondescript 1894 that closer examination reveals to be a very early 2nd edition that, for me, exemplifies the very early days of a remarkably successful model run of something over 6 (or is that 2.6?) million rifles. Or it could be a very similar 1894 hanging on my wall that’s been there, done that, been refinished a time or two and is ready to do it all over again. It put meat on my table a few years back and has probably done so for many others countless times over the past 114 years. It could even be the old Black Diamond Model 12 Trap that I sneak out to the trap range now and then to break a few birds...and perhaps some old trap shooters’ hearts.

Tough question, indeed.

 

Mike

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October 11, 2019
8:13 am
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Ct
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Thanks for sharing Mike.

AG

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Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd

October 11, 2019
4:06 pm
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TXGunNut said 
Or it could be a rather nondescript 1894 that closer examination reveals to be a very early 2nd edition that, for me, exemplifies the very early days of a remarkably successful model run of something over 6 (or is that 2.6?) million rifles.  

It's reported the total is about 7.5 million...give or take a few hundred thousand!

October 11, 2019
4:24 pm
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I don't have a lot of Winchesters, but I did inherit M1873 I guess it came from my great grandfather, has a 30 inch barrel with a set trigger that still works, in 38\40 cal. Got the letter on it, went in and out of the wharehouse on the same date. And is still configured exactly as the letter says.    terry

October 11, 2019
5:49 pm
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tsillik said
I don't have a lot of Winchesters, but I did inherit M1873 I guess it came from my great grandfather, has a 30 inch barrel with a set trigger that still works, in 38\40 cal. Got the letter on it, went in and out of the wharehouse on the same date. And is still configured exactly as the letter says.    terry  

Nice!  30" is great.  Any pictures?  I see some in an upcoming auction (two 30" and one 32").  Dreaming.

October 11, 2019
5:57 pm
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One rifle that I really like is my Winchester Sniper Rifle Type 2 that dates back to 1922. It is a deluxe hybrid of sorts in that it is built on a refinished 1903 Springfield bolt action receiver chambered in .30 Gov't. - 06. It is fitted with what I call an extra heavy barrel, in that its diameter at the receiver measures 1 and 1/4 inch vice the 1 and 1/8 inch of the standard heavy barrel.

The Type 2 version of the rifle is ultra rare, and existing references support this description since only about five of them are known to exist. Type 1's are rare as well, but are likely much more plentiful. All of the Type 2 rifles were hand made to customer specifications and each one that I have researched have proved to be different in one way or another. Both types had to be ordered through Winchester's Shooting Promotion Division.

The Winchester Sniper Rifles had a short production run, for quite obvious reasons, but it did last from 1922 to 1926 and possibly a bit longer. Perhaps, the most interesting things about these incredible rifles is that their roots are tied to World War I and the development of a better sniper rifle for our military, to include, Winchester's strong desire to successfully market a high powered bolt action rifle as quickly as possibly, which came near the end of this time. Although, the interest of building a better sniper rifle for the short term quickly came to an end with that of World War I, these heavy barreled rifles in the hands of military and civilian master marksmen left their winning marks in the annals of long range shooting in America, plus the eventual development of heavy barreled Winchester rifles that were used for sniping on the fields of battle. In this respect, the Winchester Sniper Rifles were and always will be a success.

James

https://i.imgur.com/wL1RDLa.jpgImage Enlarger

https://i.imgur.com/NyDFSrM.jpgImage Enlarger

October 11, 2019
7:10 pm
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jwm94, You can be justly proud to be the caretaker of such rare and historic firearm.

October 11, 2019
9:56 pm
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I'd be proud being the caretaker of that Remington statue!

October 11, 2019
11:25 pm
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Ct
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jwm94 said
One rifle that I really like is my Winchester Sniper Rifle Type 2 that dates back to 1922. It is a deluxe hybrid of sorts in that it is built on a refinished 1903 Springfield bolt action receiver chambered in .30 Gov't. - 06. It is fitted with what I call an extra heavy barrel, in that its diameter at the receiver measures 1 and 1/4 inch vice the 1 and 1/8 inch of the standard heavy barrel.

The Type 2 version of the rifle is ultra rare, and existing references support this description since only about five of them are known to exist. Type 1's are rare as well, but are likely much more plentiful. All of the Type 2 rifles were hand made to customer specifications and each one that I have researched have proved to be different in one way or another. Both types had to be ordered through Winchester's Shooting Promotion Division.

The Winchester Sniper Rifles had a short production run, for quite obvious reasons, but it did last from 1922 to 1926 and possibly a bit longer. Perhaps, the most interesting things about these incredible rifles is that their roots are tied to World War I and the development of a better sniper rifle for our military, to include, Winchester's strong desire to successfully market a high powered bolt action rifle as quickly as possibly, which came near the end of this time. Although, the interest of building a better sniper rifle for the short term quickly came to an end with that of World War I, these heavy barreled rifles in the hands of military and civilian master marksmen left their winning marks in the annals of long range shooting in America, plus the eventual development of heavy barreled Winchester rifles that were used for sniping on the fields of battle. In this respect, the Winchester Sniper Rifles were and always will be a success.

James

https://i.imgur.com/wL1RDLa.jpgImage Enlarger

https://i.imgur.com/NyDFSrM.jpgImage Enlarger  

Great post Janes & nice find!

AG

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Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd

October 11, 2019
11:26 pm
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Ct
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tsillik said
I don't have a lot of Winchesters, but I did inherit M1873 I guess it came from my great grandfather, has a 30 inch barrel with a set trigger that still works, in 38\40 cal. Got the letter on it, went in and out of the wharehouse on the same date. And is still configured exactly as the letter says.    terry  

Thanks Terry for sharing.

AG

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Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd

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